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May 13, 2019

Cumulative Table of Contents for this Blog (to Date, Revised VII)

It's been a long while, and I've run out of original topics for the moment, so I'm putting out another one of these. For the sake of brevity, I'll pick up where I left off since and including the last cumulative index (where you can search earlier entries).

Cumulative Table of Contents for this Blog (to Date, Revised VI) -- August 15, 2017
Open Access Article Availability -- An Alternative to ILL? -- September 26, 2017
First-Year Student Brief ILL Primer -- October 26, 2017
KSL Depository Scan Requests in ILLiad -- November 13, 2017
KSL Holiday Closure & ILL Services -- December 12, 2017

More Comments on KSL Depository Scan Requests -- January 22, 2018
"Not Required" Fields in Request Forms -- They Still Add Value -- February 22, 2018
ILLiad Notifications Gone Missing? -- Where You Might Find Them -- March 20, 2018
International Borrowing Through Interlibrary Loan -- April 23, 2018
Faculty Authorized Users -- Regular Circulation vs. ILLiad -- May 22, 2018
KSL Special User Registration in ILLiad -- Status & Department Selections -- June 13, 2018
Helpful Links Now in Your ILLiad Menu -- July 25, 2018
ILL Reminders Before Classes Begin -- August 20, 2018
Duplicate Accounts & Duplicate Requests -- September 24, 2018
ILLiad Delivered PDF's & Your Browser -- October 24, 2018
A Few Words About Password Complexity & Your ILLiad Account -- November 13, 2018
KSL Holiday Closure & ILL Services II -- December 11, 2018

The Correct Way to Request a Book Using ILLiad -- January 16, 2019
KSL ILLiad Privileges by Status Type -- February 25, 2019
Some Comments on Requesting Book Chapters with ILLiad -- March 20, 2019
Theses and Dissertations in OhioLINK -- April 15, 2019

Not such a bad way to chalk up another academic year, though. As always, hope this will be helpful!

Got questions about ILLiad or ILL policies and services? Please feel free to contact the Kelvin Smith Library ILL staff by phone at 216-368-3463 or 216-368-3517, or by e-mail at smithill@case.edu.

Continue reading "Cumulative Table of Contents for this Blog (to Date, Revised VII)"

Posted on Carl's ILLiad Blog by Carl Mariani at 12:32 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Indexes

April 15, 2019

Theses and Dissertations in OhioLINK

When you need to obtain access to a thesis or dissertation from another academic institution, the most conventional recourse is through traditional interlibrary loan services. Normally, this would be accomplished by submitting a request using the "Thesis" request form in your ILLiad account. This is an accepted method in nearly every case, and I have previously covered this general topic in detail in my entry of October 6, 2009. Although this is rather dated, most of what applies to ILL is still pretty valid (i.e, not including comments regarding the retrieval of titles from CWRU or from its predecessor institutions--WRU, CIT, etc.).

One major exception would be for any theses or dissertations done at any of the OhioLINK Member Universities, which would be available for direct borrowing through OhioLINK. Your first step would be to search the title or author in the OhioLINK Catalog. There you can submit your request directly, by clicking on the "Request it" button. You will then be required to select your institution (i.e. "CWRU") and a campus pick-up location, and then enter your network ID and password. Usually within 3 to 7 days, your thesis should arrive at the indicated location, where you can retrieve it and check it out directly on your CWRU library account. Once checked out, you will also have the opportunity to request renewals by logging into your CWRU Library Account.

Please also be aware that OhioLINK theses and dissertations that exist in digitized format are also available for download from the OhioLINK Electronic Theses and Dissertations Center. Many titles from OhioLINK Member institutions are also available for purchase in various formats (including PDF) from UMI ProQuest, although this is not a free service.

Finally, if all else fails you can try using traditional ILL through your ILLiad account for OhioLINK titles--as a last resort. This would be appropriate in cases where all available copies are marked with a status of "LIB USE ONLY" or "NON-CIRC" and no digitized version exists. It may also require special negotiations between KSL interlibrary loan staff and the granting institution library's ILL department, and take additional time to fill.

So, now that you know more about borrowing OhioLINK institution theses and dissertations, we hope we've helped you to make better use of this particular service and that it will more effectively serve your research needs.

Need help with ILL or ILLiad? Contact Kelvin Smith Library ILL by phone at 216-368-3463 or 216-368-3517, or by e-mail at smithill@case.edu.

Posted on Carl's ILLiad Blog by Carl Mariani at 10:52 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Policies | Recommendations | Services

April 11, 2019

Celebrate Preservation Week @ KSL!

Kick off the week with a presentation on “Preserving your Family History: Tips from an Archivist and Family Historian” on Wednesday, April 24, from 10am-Noon in Kelvin Smith Library’s 215 Classroom. This presentation will provide information on the challenges of being the family historian and knowing which documents and objects are most important to keep in order to tell your family’s story. The discussion will also provide options on how to preserve your history for future generations. Reserve your spot: http://cglink.me/r478816

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Later in the week, on Friday, April 26th from 2-5pm, please join our Preservation Officer, Andrew R. Mancuso, for a workshop on the Art of Paper Marbling. Have you ever looked at a book in the stacks or in a shop and seen those mesmerizing designs that seem to be painted on the binding? Join Andrew to see beautiful, historic examples from the library’s Special Collections as well as have the chance to create your very own sheet of marbled paper. Participants are advised to wear clothes they can get dirty as this is a hands-on workshop! Meet in the first floor lobby of the library – the workshop will take place in the Preservation Lab located in the lower level. Reserve your spot: http://cglink.me/r477792

Preservation Week celebrates preservation in libraries, museums, archives, and other cultural institutions that hold historic collections or items of value. The purpose of the week is to raise awareness of the important role of preservation in extending the life of a library’s collections. These services can include paper repair, rebinding, rebacking, and other activities conserve library materials.

Posted on KSL News Blog by Gina Midlik at 09:49 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

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April 11, 2019

River Fire & Fire Boats

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Highlighting the opening of the Crooked River Contrasts exhibit in the Kelvin Smith Library art gallery is a presentation by Paul Nelson, Historian of the Western Reserve Fire Museum.

Do you think the 1969 fire was the only one? With the Crooked River Contrasts exhibit as a backdrop, Mr. Nelson will discuss the fascinating history of 15 major fires along the Cuyahoga River and the battles to extinguish them. You’ll also learn more about the wonderful new Fire Museum!

Join us APRIL 23, 2019 at 2pm in the Kelvin Smith Library, first floor art gallery! A reception will follow the presentation.

Reserve your spot today: http://cglink.me/r474223

Sponsored by Kelvin Smith Library, the Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities, XTINGUISH, West Creek Conservancy and Ohio Humanities.


Posted on KSL News Blog by Gina Midlik at 09:10 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

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April 08, 2019

Women’s History Month Spotlight: Claire Doran Stancik

On 4/15/1983 Claire Doran Stancik was inducted into the Case Reserve Athletic Club Hall of Fame (now called the Spartan Club Hall of Fame). She was the second woman inducted into the university’s athletic hall of fame.

Ms. Stancik was a golfing champion. She was the first (and only woman we could document in the Archives) who received a varsity letter at Western Reserve University. In 1949 WRU awarded her the varsity “R.” This was 22 years before the first varsity women’s sport at CWRU (volleyball).

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Claire Doran receiving the her varsity letter

In 1940 she was known as Mary Claire Doran when she applied to Flora Stone Mather College of WRU. She graduated from Mather with a B.A. in Classics in 1945 and earned her M.A. in Physical Education in 1947 from the Graduate School. As an undergraduate she was a member of Delta Phi Upsilon sorority, Mortar Board, and the Athletic Association. She was part of the staff for the Mather Record (student newspaper) and the Polychronicon (yearbook). Stancik was also a member of Student Council. She graduated magna cum laude and was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. She received the Emma Maud Perkins Latin Prize as a freshman. Stancik held a teaching fellowship in Physical Education as a graduate student.

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Claire Doran as a student

Upon receipt of her degrees she was a teaching assistant at Hood College 1947-1948. Stancik then taught in the Cleveland and Cleveland Heights school districts 1948-1956. She married Robert Stancik in 1955 and had 4 children.

At age 17 in 1942 she won the first of 7 Cleveland Women’s Golf Association championships (1942, 1943, 1945, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1973). In 1949 when she received her varsity R letter, she had been the youngest woman to win the championship and the only woman to hold the title five times. She also competed in the Women’s Western Amateur Championship at the age of 18. Eventually she won 2 Women’s Western Amateur titles - in 1953 and 1954. Other accomplishments include:

-representative for the U. S. on the Women’s Amateur Golf Curtis Cup Team vs. Great Britain and Ireland in 1952 and 1954. She won all her matches.
-Ohio Women’s champion 4 times: 1950, 1952, 1953, 1954
-runnerup in the 1950 Titleholders tournament (behind the legendary Babe Didrikson Zaharias)
-won the Marion Miley Trophy in 1951 and 1953
-won the 1951 Women’s Doherty Title
-in 1976 she was inducted into the Greater Cleveland Sports Hall of Fame

Claire Doran Stancik died 11/16/2016 in Naperville, Illinois. She was survived by her husband and 4 children.

Posted on Recollections from the Archives by Helen Conger at 01:16 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events and Activities | People

March 20, 2019

Mankiller: A Documentary & Discussion with Filmmaker Valerie Mohl

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Take time out of your evening study schedule to learn more about Wilma Mankiller. She was an activist and feminist—a woman who fought injustice and gave a voice to the voiceless as the Cherokee Nation’s first female Principal Chief. Mankiller reminds audiences of the true meaning of servant leadership and serves as a wake-up call to take action for positive change.

Director and producer Valerie Red-Horse Mohl (Cherokee) will speak following the screening, examining the legacy of Mankiller's formidable life, discussing her works as the preeminent collaborator with American Indian tribal nations bringing Native stories to the screen, and contemplating the critical roles of women in leadership.

Screening will be in Tinkham Veale University Center, Ballroom C on Tuesday, March 26th from 6 to 8:30 pm. Free and open to the community; light refreshments will be served.

Please RSVP at: http://cglink.me/r451057

Kelvin Smith Library is co-sponsoring this with CWRU, YWCA and The Lake Erie Native American Council.

Posted on KSL News Blog by Angela Sloan at 02:09 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

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March 21, 2019

CMA Digital Works of Art - Collage Competition

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In support of the Cleveland Museum of Art’s new Open Access initiative that provides unlimited online access to over 30,000 items within their permanent collection, Kelvin Smith Library along with the Department of Art History and Art and the Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities is sponsoring a competition.

Case Western Reserve University students, faculty and staff are invited to use digital technology to create dynamic collages using the Cleveland Museum of Art’s open access images. Winning entries will be displayed in the library’s art gallery and will appear on the Cleveland Museum of Art’s Tumblr page.

If interested, register for the Collage Creation Event on April 6, 2019 from 10am-2pm in the Freedman Center Collaboration Commons, located on the first floor of the Kelvin Smith Library. Staff will be available to assist with technology needs to create your collage. Participants do not have to attend this event to submit a collage – you can submit on your own to the link provided below. Cash prizes will be awarded for first, second and third place winners!

Register for the April 6th event at: http://cglink.me/r451708

For contest details and submission, go to: https://researchguides.case.edu/cmacollage

Posted on KSL News Blog by Gina Midlik at 08:40 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

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March 20, 2019

Some Comments on Requesting Book Chapters with ILLiad

Since the issue of how to properly employ the "Book Chapter" form has recently become a bit confusing for some users, this month's blog will attempt to serve as guide for better practices. It is also intended to act as sort of a follow-up to my previous entry of January 16, 2019.

So, exactly what can be problematic when submitting a request for a book chapter? What can make it more onerous for ILL staff at KSL (as well as for the ILL staff at any potential supplier libraries) to efficiently process requests for book chapters? Here is an illustrative accounting of some of the rather challenging scenarios we routinely are confronted with...

* Citing "page numbers" in lieu of an actual chapter title --- Page numbers should be only referenced in the "Inclusive Pages" field, and nowhere else. If you do not know the actual chapter title, simply indicate "unknown" or "n/a" in the "Chapter Title" field. Referencing page numbers that do not define a verifiable book chapter causes confusion and hesitation on the part of a potential lender, who will likely question the citation or simply choose not to fill the request. If you do actually receive an electronically delivered scan of pages cited in this way, they may not have a coherent appearance with a logical beginning and end -- assuming this is what you really wanted in the first place.

* Inexactitude in the citing of pages, as well as requesting exorbitant numbers of pages, may result in a loan of the entire book being substituted for a scan of the cited pages. It is the prerogative of potential lender libraries to do this, if they so choose, and it may not be the result you originally expected. In such a case, ILL staff at KSL will in turn pass the loan along to you as a returnable transaction, and are not required to try providing you the material in the form of a scan -- you will have the opportunity to decide exactly how you wish to scan the pages you require, using equipment available on-site within the library.

* Copyright issues --- Any portion of a book may be restricted by the author and/or publisher, but usually the standard limit is 15% of the total page length of the volume (including the total of pages from multiple requests out of the same book title at a given instance). Requesting all or most of the chapters within a book (simultaneously, or over a span of time) in an attempt to obtain a virtually complete electronic reproduction of the entire item is not acceptable, and we strongly advise against the practice -- this goes for entire journal issues, as well!

* Local availability of books --- You will likely receive cancellation notices when requesting chapters from currently available books held either in KSL or at other CWRU campus library locations (i.e., Cleveland Health Sciences, MSASS or Law). At our discretion, ILL staff may also cancel such a request when the chapter is available for download from an accessible electronic edition in our own E-Book collection. The only exception applies to books and volumes available in the off-site KSL Depository location, as discussed in my previous entries of November 13, 2017 and January 22, 2018.

* Requesting chapters from KSL books, books from other CWRU campus libraries, or from OhioLINK and SearchOhio books which you have currently borrowed and checked out to yourself is to be particularly discouraged. We strongly recommend that you avoid submitting requests for scans from circulating materials that you already have in your possession. Keep in mind that high-quality scanning equipment is available for your judicious use, right here within the Kelvin Smith Library.

These kinds of situations are inclined to cause unfortunate delays in the successful filling of requests for book chapters, in most instances. We hope that taking these examples of possible miscalculation into account will help result in more favorable outcomes, by offering guidance as to what to avoid when submitting book chapter requests.

Kelvin Smith Library ILL staff are available by phone at 216-368-3463 or 216-368-3517 (during regular office hours--Monday through Friday, 9:00 AM to 4:30 PM), or by e-mail at smithill@case.edu.

Posted on Carl's ILLiad Blog by Carl Mariani at 03:00 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Citations | Policies | Recommendations

March 13, 2019

State of Ohio Poet Laureate Celebrates Hart Crane

Dave Lucas, Poet Laureate of Ohio, will celebrate the writings of Cleveland poet, Hart Crane at Kelvin Smith Library on March 25th from 4:00 pm to 5:30 pm in the Dampeer Room, 2nd floor.

Known for his difficult and highly stylized modernist poetry, Crane has been widely recognized as one of the most influential poets of the early 20th century. Dave Lucas will read Crane’s works as well as the writings of other influential poets, and the event will coincide with a pop-up exhibit in KSL’s Hatch Reading Room featuring Crane’s books and manuscripts from the library’s special collections.

Reserve Your Spot Today: http://cglink.me/r451056


Download file

Posted on KSL News Blog by Gina Midlik at 03:18 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

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March 13, 2019

Pittsburgh's Perfect Crime: The Hows, Whys, and What-Nows of a Major Book Theft

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Kelvin Smith Library and the Judge Ben C. Green Law Library welcome Travis McDade, curator of law rare books and Associate Professor of Library Service at the University of Illinois, the country’s foremost expert on crimes against rare books, maps, documents. He will discuss his experience studying crimes against these printed cultural heritage resources.

This talk will be held in the School of Law’s Moot Court Room Gund A59 on Wednesday, March 20 from 3 to 4:30 pm. Light refreshments will be served.

Register now to save your spot!: http://cglink.me/r450725

Download file

Posted on KSL News Blog by Angela Sloan at 04:01 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

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January 24, 2019

Kelvin Smith Library Wins Major National Award

The Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) named the Kelvin Smith Library of Case Western University as the university recipient of the 2019 Excellence in Academic Libraries Award. Sponsored by ACRL and GOBI Library Solutions from EBSCO, the award recognizes the staff of a university library for programs that deliver exemplary services and resources to further the educational mission of the institution.

“I am delighted that ACRL can highlight the many amazing accomplishments of academic libraries through this award,” said ACRL Executive Director Mary Ellen K. Davis. “This year’s winners demonstrate a clear commitment to student success, a creative and inventive mindset that results in innovative programs, and engagement with the local and campus communities. Receiving an Excellence in Academic Libraries Award is a tribute to each library and its staff for outstanding services, programs, and leadership.”

Case Western Reserve University’s Kelvin Smith Library, winner in the university category, was selected for its collaborative approach to problem solving.

“The Kelvin Smith Library partners to solve community problems and applies what they do to solve problems within their own community,” said Irene M.H. Herold, chair of the 2019 Excellence in Academic Libraries Committee and librarian of the college at the College of Wooster. “As quoted in their nomination, ‘Research can be used for the advocacy of communities experiencing disruption and inequality,’ and the Kelvin Smith Library is a shining model of this.”

“Noteworthy among numerous reported activities were the Freedman Fellowship for Digital Scholarship program, using space assessment data to make changes in support of student success, and its National Personal Librarian Conference,” Herold continued. “The library not only embodies their strategic plan goals of ‘research,’ ‘learn,’ and ‘experience’ in everything they do, but also is user feedback driven to ‘continuously redesign the library to ensure that new generations of students continue to respond positively so that they see the library as being their library.’”

The Freedman Fellowship for Digital Scholarship program supports full-time faculty with integrating new digital tools and technology into their research. Since its inception in 2010, the program has awarded over $90,000 to more than 50 faculty members for a wide range of projects, including a sexual assault kit initiative using ArcGIS visual mapping software to plot assault data, undergraduate student research on race and education in Cleveland Heights, and 3D imaging of artifacts from the Cleveland Museum of Natural History to increase their accessibility through a virtual reality experience.

“We are elated to receive this important recognition of the collaborative achievements of our highly motivated and creative staff, who work tirelessly to ensure student success, advance research, and provide a conducive environment to stimulate a love of learning,” said Arnold Hirshon, associate provost and university librarian at Case Western Reserve University. “Our culture is one of unceasing reinvention, with a commitment to continuous exploration, experimentation, systematic program development, and rigorous assessment. Being the recipients of the ACRL award inspires us to persevere in our never-ending pursuit to provide pioneering, vibrant, and highly user-centric programs, services, and facilities for our university community.”

The Kelvin Smith Library will be presented with a plaque and $3,000 at an award ceremony that will be open to the entire campus community and will be held on April 9 at 3:30 pm. Additional information about the award ceremony will be shared as it becomes available.

Posted on KSL News Blog by Corina Chang at 01:50 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

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March 11, 2019

Exploration and Illustration in the Art of Nature

As part of the 2019 Cleveland Humanities Festival, Kelvin Smith Library presents:

Exploration and Illustration in the Art of Nature

Thursday, March 21, 2019
4:00 – 5:30 pm
Kelvin Smith Library
Dampeer Room, 2nd Floor

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Before digital cameras made it easy to capture a rare bird, the tools of observation were pencils and brushes. Before Google Images, scientists and students turned first to the great works of scientific illustrations. William Claspy, Head of Kelvin Smith Library's Special Collections and Archives, will give a broad overview of scientific illustration from the 16th through the 19th centuries, featuring works from the library's collections. Examples of these items will be on hand to view in the Hatch Reading Room of Special Collections. Reception to follow.

Reserve your spot today! http://cglink.me/r464486

Posted on KSL News Blog by Gina Midlik at 05:14 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

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March 07, 2019

Proposals for the FREEDMAN FELLOWS Program NOW Being Accepted

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The Freedman Center for Digital Scholarship is now accepting applications for the 2019 Freedman Fellows Program for full-time CWRU faculty and staff. This annual award is given to full-time CWRU faculty and staff whose current scholarly research projects involve the use of digital tools and processes that are of scholarly or instructional interest (e.g., data sets, digital texts, digital images, databases), and have clearly articulated project outcomes.

Proposed requests can range from $1,000 to a maximum of $15,000 to support the expenses related to innovative scholarly or creative projects that meet the criteria. Awarded amounts may vary depending on scope of project.

Proposals for the program are due by Friday, April 12, 2019, at 5:00 p.m.

Applicants are encouraged to schedule a consultation with members of the Digital Learning & Scholarship team before submitting an application. Team members can help clarify a project, identify scope creep and help pinpoint possible deliverables. To schedule a consultation, contact freedmancenter@case.edu. For additional questions contact Digital Learning and Scholarship Librarian, Charlie Harper, at charles.harper@case.edu.

For more information about the Freedman Fellows program and how to apply, visit http://library.case.edu/ksl/freedmancenter/digitalscholarship/fellows/.

CWRU Students – if you are interested in using digital tools and technologies and creating a work of digital scholarship then you many want to find out more about the Freedman Center Student Fellowship Program. The call for proposals will take place in fall semester 2019 but you are encouraged to contact the freedmancenter@case.edu as soon as possible to set up a consultation.

Posted on KSL News Blog by Gina Midlik at 04:13 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

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February 27, 2019

African-American History Month Spotlight: Ruby B. Pernell

Ruby B. Pernell was a professor at the Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences (MSASS), 1968-1982. She was Grace Longwell Coyle Professor Emeritus of Social Work from 7/1/1982 until her death in 2001. When appointed Acting Dean of MSASS in 1973-1974, she became the first African-American woman dean at CWRU.

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Ruby B. Pernell, 1981

Pernell was born 2/21/1917 in Birmingham, Alabama and grew up in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. She received the B.S. in Biology (1939) and the M.S. in Social Administration (1944) from the University of Pittsburgh and her Ph.D. from the University of London, England (1959). Prior to her work at CWRU, Pernell was a Program Coordinator at Soho Community House in Pittsburgh, Professor of Social Work at the University of Minnesota, and Social Welfare Attache at the U. S. Embassy in New Delhi, India. She was a visiting Professor at the University of Denver, Atlanta University, and University of Washington.

When Dr. Pernell came to CWRU in 1968 it was as the Grace Longwell Coyle Professor in Social Work. She was offered the position in 12/1966 but wanted to fulfill her contract as Social Welfare Attache at the U. S. Embassy in India - which was completed in 2/1968. As MSASS Dean Herman Stein wrote, “The professor so named is to be one who could add to social work knowledge, who has breadth of understanding and interest, who is oriented to social philosophy and attuned to the major social problems of our society.” In accepting the offer Ruby Pernell wrote, “I really am overwhelmed and humbled by the idea that any one would think I could fittingly fill a chair commemorating Grace Coyle.”

Her scholarly interests were curriculum development, program administration, and international social welfare. In her year as Acting Dean, MSASS introduced new facets into the curriculum by adding a study sequence on Management of Human Services which was concerned with management of social agencies and program direction and planning. The School also started the first phase of a new plan for crediting work done in undergraduate social work programs. MSASS and the Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences cooperated to launch the new Bachelor of Science in Applied Social Sciences at Western Reserve College (the university’s undergraduate liberal arts college). Students in the new degree program were prepared to work in areas of manpower training, social services, corrections and community organizations. A part-time program for employed social workers to work toward their master’s degrees was in development.

In addition to her work as a faculty member at MSASS, Dr. Pernell served on the CWRU Afro-American Studies Program Advisory Committee and was the chair for several years.

She worked on social policy issues in India, the Sudan, Egypt, and Jamaica. Dr. Pernell served as consultant to several U. S. government agencies such as the U. S. Agency for International Development and the Department of Health, Education and Welfare. She published a number of articles on social group work, cross-cultural and international social welfare as well as other social welfare subjects.

Dr. Pernell was a founder of the Association for the Advancement of Social Work with Groups. She was active in the Council on Social Work Education, the National Association of Social Workers, the International Association of Schools of Social Work and the U. S. Committee of the International Council on Social Welfare. She served on the Peace Corps Advisory Committee and on the boards of various community groups and agencies such as the Cleveland International Program, the North Area YWCA, the YWCA of East Cleveland and the Camp Fire Girls of Greater Cleveland. She served as consultant nationally and internationally. In 1997 Ruby Pernell received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the National Association of Social Workers Region III.

On 2/4/2001 Ruby Pernell died at home at the age of 83.

You can read past CWRU African-American History Month recollections from 2018, 2016, 2015, 2014, 2013, and 2011.

Posted on Recollections from the Archives by Helen Conger at 04:54 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: People

February 27, 2019

Summer Program in Statistics, Quantitative Methods, and Data Analysis for Students, Faculty, and Researchers of All Skill Levels and Backgrounds

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Participants in the ICPSR Summer Program learn how to understand data and gain valuable research skills that help them to advance their education and careers. The program also features supplemental lectures and talks on important professional topics, such as data reproducibility, research transparency, and methodological issues related to the study of race, ethnicity, and gender. Our four-week sessions take place in Ann Arbor, Michigan; in 2019, the First Session (https://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/content/sumprog/schedule.html#!firstSession) runs from June 24 to July 19, and the Second Session (https://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/content/sumprog/schedule.html#!secondSession) runs from July 22 to August 16.

To view our full schedule and register, visit www.icpsr.umich.edu/sumprog

Scholarship Opportunities
Most ICPSR scholarships (https://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/content/sumprog/scholarships/index.html) provide a registration fee waiver for the Summer Program’s four-week sessions. Also, in 2019, ICPSR has expanded its Diversity Scholarships (https://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/content/sumprog/scholarships/diversity.html) to cover incoming and continuing graduate students from under-represented groups. The application deadline for all 2019 ICPSR scholarships is Sunday, March 31, 2019.

Questions?
Contact the ICPSR Summer Program at sumprog@icpsr.umich.edu or (734) 763-7400.

Posted on KSL News Blog by Corina Chang at 01:54 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events & News @KSL

February 25, 2019

KSL ILLiad Privileges by Status Type

Since I've never quite addressed the topic from this angle, I figure now is as good a time as any. I had previously spoken to the issue of registration for special user types (along with their appropriate department selections) in my entry for June 13, 2018.

That being said, below is a list of all the possible user status types currently in the KSL ILLiad system, along with the service privileges afforded to them...

* Faculty (including Emeritus Faculty) -- ILL (articles & loans), KSL scan electronic delivery (journals, books), *ILL book campus delivery (designated departments only, with individual faculty sign-up), KSL Depository scan electronic delivery

* Staff (including Visiting Scholars, during sponsorship period) -- ILL (articles & loans), KSL Depository scan electronic delivery

* Graduate (including Post-Doctoral) -- ILL (articles & loans), KSL Depository scan electronic delivery

* Undergraduate -- ILL (articles & loans), KSL Depository scan electronic delivery

* Distance Ed Graduate (DM Program at WSOM only) -- ILL (articles & loans), KSL scan electronic delivery (journals, books), *KSL & ILL book delivery to home or office address (unless campus pick-up preferred), KSL Depository scan electronic delivery

* Alumni Online Library (registered Alumni only) -- KSL scan electronic delivery (journals, books), KSL Depository scan electronic delivery

* Depository Request (all other CWRU members who use ILLiad for ILL at non-KSL libraries) -- KSL Depository scan electronic delivery (only)

*Library patrons (i.e., Faculty & Distance Ed Graduates) who are eligible for ILLiad book delivery usually also enjoy a parallel service level for direct borrowing OhioLINK & SearchOhio loans. This, however, is not managed through the ILLiad system; please contact the KSL Service Center at 216-368-3506 or smithcontact@case.edu, for further assistance.

Depository Request scanning services only apply to materials (journals, books) held in the KSL Depository collections, as indicated in our online catalog. They do not include scanning from any other KSL collection locations.

Alumni and Depository Request users may not use the KSL ILLiad system for ILL services. Alumni should use their local public, academic or corporate library systems for this purpose. Depository Request users should use their respective CWRU campus library (CHSL, Law, MSASS) or affiliate library (CIM, CIA) service points for ILL services.

Please also be aware that ILL staff routinely verify the status and good standing of Faculty, Distance Ed Graduates, and Alumni Online Library users registered in our ILLiad patron database against our internal library patron account records, as well as in the University Directory and individual department websites. All potential ILLiad registrants who customarily use CWRU library systems other than KSL for ILL services will be referred to their respective service points (except for KSL Depository scan retrieval & delivery).

In conclusion, please note that more detailed information on special user level services may be viewed in the KSL ILLiad Customer Help page. As always, we hope this brief discussion has been helpful.

If you have any questions concerning our interlibrary loan services or ILLiad system, please feel free to contact Kelvin Smith Library ILL staff by phone at 216-368-3463 or 216-368-3517, or by e-mail us at smithill@case.edu.

Posted on Carl's ILLiad Blog by Carl Mariani at 11:37 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Policies | Recommendations | Services

February 25, 2019

Game Night at Kelvin Smith Library

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It's time for KSL's Game Night! Put away your laptops and meet with friends for a night of fun board games! Bring your friends or meet new ones on March 7, 2019 from 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm at Kelvin Smith Library’s Freedman Center (1st Floor)!

To keep your competitive mind properly fueled, we will provide snacks, and soda.

Sign Up Today: http://cglink.me/r450638

Posted on KSL News Blog by Corina Chang at 10:44 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events & News @KSL

February 15, 2019

Robert H. Rawson, Jr. Named KSL's Second Distinguished Visiting Scholar

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Robert H. Rawson, Jr. has been named as the Kelvin Smith Library’s Distinguished Visiting Scholar. The program debuted in 2013 as a way to enrich library interactions with faculty, students, staff and the community, and to create collaborative intellectual and research endeavors that will advance the mission of the library as a vibrant and diverse source of knowledge.

Rawson’s time as Distinguished Visiting Scholar will include working with the library to connect with the broader community through focused outreach events, and to advise the library regarding its collections and strategic goals. He may also prepare publications or exhibits based on the library’s collections and his areas of expertise. “I am grateful for the opportunity to share my interests and experience in the book world with the constituents of KSL – faculty, students, staff and the broader community that supports the library” Rawson said. “I also look forward to contributing to the enhancement of KSL’s engagement with the community.”

A retired partner at the Jones Day law firm, Rawson specialized in antitrust litigation. He has been involved in higher education for decades. He served for over twenty years on the board of trustees of Princeton University, including thirteen years as chairman of the board. Princeton awarded Rawson an honorary Doctor of Laws degree in 2011. From 2007 through 2016, he served on the Board of Trustees of Cleveland State University, including the last several years as chairman. Cleveland State University also awarded Rawson an honorary Doctor of Laws degree. He served from 2008-2011 as the Interim Dean of the Case Western Reserve University School of Law. Since 2015, Rawson has also been a member of KSL’s Special Collections Advisory Board.

Rawson is a dedicated bibliophile and book collector, with particular interests in books produced by the fine press movement in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, as well as engravings and illustrations, and fine bindings. He is a member of major bibliophilic organizations, including the Rowfant Club of Cleveland, and the Grolier Club in New York.

Arnold Hirshon, Associate Provost and University Librarian at Case Western Reserve University, said, “we are delighted that we were able to secure Bob Rawson’s agreement to serve in this capacity. His bibliophilic areas of expertise, and his strong interest in building relations with the Cleveland community, make him an ideal choice to serve in this capacity.”

Posted on KSL News Blog by Corina Chang at 12:08 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events & News @KSL

February 12, 2019

Fair Use & Controlled Digital Lending

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Date: Wednesday, February 27, 1:30-2:30pm
Location: Moot Courtroom (A59), Case Western Reserve University School of Law, 11075 East Blvd.Cleveland, Ohio 44106


Join Aaron Perzanowski, Professor of Law at Case Western Reserve University, in a lecture and Q&A about copyright, fair use, and the emerging method of “controlled digital lending.” Copyright law is meant to encourage creativity and the advancement of cultural and scientific progress. It is vitally important to innovation, creativity, and your scholarship. This event is co-sponsored by Kelvin Smith Library and the Judge Ben C. Green Law Library.

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Aaron Perzanowski teaches copyright, trademark, and property law. His research on the intersection of intellectual and personal property explores the notion of ownership in a digital economy. His work on IP and social norms considers the ways in which informal governance influences creative production. He is the co-author of The End of Ownership (MIT Press 2016) and Creativity Without Law (NYU Press 2017). His work has appeared or is forthcoming in the Berkeley Technology Law Journal, George Washington Law Review, Harvard Journal of Law & Technology, Minnesota Law Review, Northwestern Law Review, Notre Dame Law Review, UC Davis Law Review, UCLA Law Revie¬¬w, and the University of Pennsylvania Law Review, among others. He’s been quoted in national and international media outlets including the Wall Street Journal, The New Yorker, NPR, The Economist, Forbes, LA Times, Wired, BBC, CBC, and la Repubblica.

Posted on KSL News Blog by Corina Chang at 03:20 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events & News @KSL

February 06, 2019

Offerings to Moloch

Watched Metropolis again for the first time in awhile last night. I had never previously noticed or paid attention to the fact that the entire story takes place in 2026...

Continue reading "Offerings to Moloch "

Posted on Exp[2i/(Zachary M Burell)] by Zachary Burell at 06:34 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged:

February 06, 2019

Excerpt from Learn AI: Machine Learning and Deep Learning Online Courses

Below is an excerpt of an article published recently on OpenCourser about Artificial Intelligence, particularly in two branches, Machine Learning and Deep Learning. Follow the link to read the full article.

The first set of courses here are meant to help you establish a foundational understanding. Some of these courses, or collections of courses, may also cover advanced topics. No matter how advanced they get though, they’ll always start on the ground floor—these courses are designed for all learners, including those entirely new to AI.

The next set of courses focus on introducing AI in context of specific tools, techniques, and applications. These courses lean heavily towards teaching practical "how-to” knowledge. Compare that to the first set of courses, which balance theory and science with practice.

We recommend taking these courses to extend existing knowledge or to ramp up quickly. If you’re looking to implement AI algorithms in a short amount of time, start with these courses.

Our last segment looks at online courses that focus on specific techniques powered by tools like Keras, PyTorch, TensorFlow, and Spark. These courses require prior knowledge of ML and DL and are designed with advanced learners and industry practitioners in mind.

We recommend these courses to deepen your expertise or to help prepare for a career in AI.

Posted on A Lot of Online Courses by Denton Zhou at 12:04 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: AI | Online Courses | artificial | courses | deep | intelligence | learn | learning | machine | moocs | online

March 18, 2013

The Women's Committee of the Cleveland Play House

The Women’s Committee of the Cleveland Play House was founded to further the interests of the Play House, initially serving as liaison between the theatre and the public. The first Women’s Committee meeting was held in the Brooks Theatre in May 1932 at the request of the Board of Trustees. At that time several committees were formed to assist Play House personnel in the areas of subscription sales, promotional and social events.

ballet.jpg Admission ticket to Women's Committee fundraising event.

These early assignments quickly expanded to encompass twenty-one committees devoted to such tasks as event coordination, ushering, children’s theatre efforts, marketing campaigns and major fundraising drives which essentially relieved the Play House of the expense of administrative staff in the hard times of the 1930’s. Their stated goal was “To assist in every way possible in any way help was needed” which resulted in the cultivation of a dedicated and multi-talented volunteer work force supporting every operation of the theatre for eighty years.

Fundraising was an important function of the Women’s Committee and their aim was to have fun doing it. Planning and executing countless luncheons, balls, benefit performances, fashion shows, comedy revues, gift shops, tours and commemorative publications over the lifespan of the committee raised hundreds of thousands of dollars to aid the theatre and spread good will throughout the community. Over time, the group laid the foundation for a Men’s Committee to broaden the volunteer base among Play House members. Perhaps best known for establishing and managing the Play House Club in the 1960’s, the Men’s Committee also engaged in a wide array of projects designed to support the Play House.

mens.2.jpg Men's Committee social event invitation.

In October 2012, membership of the Women’s Committee closed the first chapter of their history with the Play House by organizing one last luncheon, the proceeds of which were combined with the balance of their treasury to create the Women’s Committee of The Cleveland Play House Endowment Fund.

Contact Special Collections for details about our current exhibit of Cleveland Play House Archives material.

Posted on KSL Special Collections News Blog by Eleanor Blackman at 01:58 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Cleveland Play House

February 05, 2019

Case Western Reserve University Student Newspapers Now Online

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The Special Collections and Archives team at Kelvin Smith Library has digitized over 150 years of Case Western Reserve University student newspapers dating back to 1862. The collection totals over 6,263 issues and is comprised of 55,769 pages and 314,236 articles. The newspapers cover an enormous breadth of campus life including athletics, exhibits, concerts and lectures, university policies, and current events.

The newspapers include:

Western Reserve Souvenir (1862, 1864)
Western Reserve Collegian (1863)
The Adelbert (1889/90-1902/03)
The Case Tech (1903/04-1979/80)
The Reserve Weekly (1903/04-1937/38)
Cleveland College Life (1928/29-1952/53)
The Reserve Tribune (1938/39-1968/69)
The Mather Record (1939/40-1951/52)
The Observer (1969/70-2009/10) Later issues of The Observer are already available online.

Each issue is full-text searchable meaning you can browse by date or keyword search across articles and advertisements. PDF copies are available for download and it is all free.

Browse the collection today: https://newspapers.case.edu/

For more information, please contact University Archives at (216) 368-7229 or archives@case.edu


Posted on KSL News Blog by Corina Chang at 01:13 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events & News @KSL

February 05, 2019

Access to Library Databases and Resources On and Off-Campus Has Just Gotten Easier

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OpenAthens is the library’s new authentication system and has replaced VPN for all off-campus access. It will require no action other than signing in through CWRU's Single Sign-On (SSO).

You can access resources on any device from anywhere, without requiring multiple logins or the need to log into the VPN for nearly all library electronic resources. A few other things to observe:

- You will need to log-in the first time in a session to access all library resources (even when on the campus wired network or the "Case Wireless" network). After you are logged in the first time, and providing you do not close your browser window, access should continue even if you change from one resource to another.

- Web addresses for some resources have changed, so previously bookmarked shortcuts may no longer be working. Please start your search of all resources (including the library catalog) by locating it first on the library website on the ejournal or database list. You may also use the CWRU Libraries Search box (in the upper right corner of the library web page).

- Make sure to close your browser when you are done, especially if you access resources from a public workstation.

For more information on OpenAthens and authentication: https://researchguides.case.edu/discovery

A few resources will still require VPN to gain access: https://researchguides.case.edu/discovery/VPN

Posted on KSL News Blog by Corina Chang at 11:33 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events & News @KSL

February 04, 2019

Celebrating Paul Laurence Dunbar

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Dr. Herbert Woodward Martin, professor emeritus at the University of Dayton, will present Paul Laurence Dunbar’s poetry. Dunbar (1872-1906) was the first African American poet to be nationally recognized for his literary works, which include short stories, novels, and poems.

Date: February 13, 2019
Time: 4:00pm – 6:00 pm
Location: Kelvin Smith Library, Dampeer Room, 2nd Floor
Reserve Your Spot Today: http://cglink.me/r450649

Posted on KSL News Blog by Corina Chang at 01:44 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events & News @KSL

February 01, 2019

Manage Your Scholarly Reputation (For Faculty and Graduate Students)

Kelvin Smith Library is offering a series of workshops to support faculty and graduate students in maximizing the impact of their scholarly publication. The workshop series will help attendees navigate the evolving publishing landscape, from copyright law, marketing research, online presence, to negotiating contracts.

Each session is offered twice at Kelvin Smith Library (Room 215 or Dampeer Room) and may be taken independently if you are unable to take the entire series.

Register Today: https://researchguides.case.edu/ImpactWorkshopSeries

“Marketing Your Scholarship and Yourself” | Tues, 12 February 2019, 2:45 pm - 3:45 pm OR Wed, 13 February 2019, 12:45 pm - 1:45 pm

“Measuring Your Scholarly Impact” | Tues, 19 February 2019, 11:30 am - 12:30 pm OR Wed, 20 February 2019, 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

“Where to Publish” | Tues, 5 March 2019, 2:30 pm - 3:30 pm OR Wed, 6 March 2019, 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

“Engaging with Digital Scholarship” | Wed, 18 March 2019, 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm OR Thurs, 21 March 2019, 11:30 am - 12:30 pm

“Leveraging Your Rights as an Author: Copyright and Scholarly Publishing” | Tues, 26 March 2019, 2:30 pm- 3:30 pm OR Thurs, 28 March 2019, 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Questions? Contact the Kelvin Smith Library team at ksl-mail@case.edu or 216.368.2992. For more information on other library events, join the KSL CampusGroups page: https://community.case.edu/KSL/club_signup

Posted on KSL News Blog by Corina Chang at 02:09 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events & News @KSL

January 30, 2019

University Student Newspapers Now Online

The University Archives is happy to announce that nine student newspaper titles from the collection have been digitized and are available for online use. Each issue is full-text searchable and PDF copies are available for free download. The titles include:

Western Reserve Souvenir (1862, 1864)
Western Reserve Collegian (1863)
The Adelbert (1889/90-1902/03)
The Case Tech (1903/04-1979/80)
The Reserve Weekly (1903/04-1937/38)
Cleveland College Life (1928/29-1952/53)
The Reserve Tribune (1938/39-1968/69)
The Mather Record (1939/40-1951/52)
The Observer (1969/70-2009/10) Later issues of The Observer are already available online.

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Page one of the Western Reserve Souvenir, December 1862

As our users are well aware, the student newspapers provide a rich source of information about student and university life.

Kelvin Smith Library contracted with DL Consulting to complete this project. The University Archives staff and students digitized 991 issues numbering 13,283 pages. Hudson Archival digitized the remaining issues from the microfilm copies. Veridian provided article segmentation and created PDF files for each issue. While optical character recognition software was run on each issue, some errors may have occurred. No corrections to the text were made. You can become a text corrector by registering on the site.

We are excited about this new online resource provided to the university community and beyond. Please explore and enjoy. You are welcome to send feedback to archives@case.edu.

Posted on Recollections from the Archives by Helen Conger at 05:08 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Things

January 28, 2019

The One Hundredth Anniversary of the Michelson-Morley Experiment

In 1987, CWRU celebrated the centennial of the Michelson-Morley experiment. Albert A. Michelson was a physicist at the Case School of Applied Science and Edward W. Morley was a chemist at Western Reserve University. In their revolutionary 1887 experiment, Michelson and Morley used a device called an interferometer to measure the interference properties of light waves. Their goal was to determine how the speed of light would be affected by the directional flow of “luminiferous aether,” which was a substance that was believed to transmit light throughout space. Albert A. Michelson designed the interferometer to measure the difference between the speed of light traveling in the direction of the “aether wind,” and the speed of light traveling in the opposite direction. The Michelson-Morley experiment found that there was no substantial difference in the measurements of the speed of light, which ultimately proved that “luminiferous aether” does not exist. This groundbreaking discovery has been described as marking the birth of modern physics, and led to the development of other scientific theories, including Albert Einstein’s Special Theory of Relativity, which transformed our understanding of space and time.

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Model of the Michelson-Morley Interferometer, circa 1975

The Michelson-Morley Centennial Celebration, entitled “Light, Space, and Time – A Cleveland Festival,” took place at CWRU and in the surrounding area from April to December 1987. The celebration kicked off with the opening ceremonies at Severance Hall on 04/24/1987, in which the annual Michelson-Morley Award was presented to internationally renowned scientists, Robert H. Dicke and George A. Olah. From 04/24/1987 to 04/25/1987, a symposium was held on campus, entitled “The Legacy of Edward W. Morley: 100 Years of Chemistry at Case Western Reserve University.” It included lectures on chemical research given by twelve distinguished alumni, former faculty, and current faculty from CWRU.

Throughout the spring, summer, and fall, several exhibits, lectures, musical performances, and other symposia in honor of the centennial of the Michelson-Morley experiment took place on campus and in the greater Cleveland area:

From 04/25/1987 to 12/31/1987, an exhibit entitled “The Atom: Peril and Promise,” was available to the public at the Cleveland Health Education Museum. The exhibit examined the beneficial and harmful aspects of radiation. It included photographs of color drawings and paintings by survivors of the nuclear blasts at Hiroshima and Nagasaki that took place at the end of World War II. Another exhibit, entitled “The Michelson-Morley Experiment of 1887: American Science Comes of Age,” was presented at the Western Reserve Historical Society from 04/26/1987 to 09/30/1987. It included photographs, monographs, drawings, and notes by Albert A. Michelson, letters from Edward W. Morley and Albert Einstein, and a full-scale replica of the Michelson-Morley experiment constructed by CWRU students.

As part of the Frontiers in Chemistry lecture series on campus, several Nobel Laureates were invited to give guest lectures in honor of the centennial of the Michelson-Morley experiment. Manfred Eigen delivered a lecture entitled, “Evolutionary Biotechnology” on 08/27/1987, Herbert C. Brown conducted a lecture called, “A General Asymmetric Synthesis via Chiral Organoboranes” on 10/01/1987, and Derek Barton spoke about “The Invention of Organic Chemical Reactions” on 10/15/1987.

The one hundredth anniversary of the Michelson-Morley experiment was also commemorated through art. During the centennial celebration, a light sculpture entitled “Light Path Crossing,” by artist Dale Eldred, was installed on the roof of Crawford Hall. The sculpture has a large diffraction grating that separates and exhibits vibrant colors, in honor of the experiment. On 10/28/1987, the Cleveland Institute of Music Chamber Orchestra performed two works commissioned especially for the Michelson-Morley Centennial Celebration at the Cleveland Museum of Art. A musical piece for solo violin with synthesizer, harp, and percussion was performed in honor of Albert A. Michelson. In honor of Edward W. Morley, a piece for organ and chamber orchestra was performed. In addition, from 10/29/1987 to 10/31/1987, the Cleveland Orchestra presented a symphonic work by Philip Glass, that was commissioned especially for the Michelson-Morley Centennial Celebration, at Severance Hall.

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Poster for the Modern Physics in America Symposium, 1987

Several scientific symposia took place on campus in October 1987, beginning with a Symposium on Science, Arts, and Humanities on 10/10/1987, in which Philip Morrison of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and other renowned speakers discussed the interrelationships among these different fields of study. From 10/21/1987 to 10/23/1987, the “Harland G. Wood Symposium in Biomedical Sciences” took place, and included a Merton F. Utter Memorial Lecture by Nobel Laureate David Baltimore. A symposium on “The Michelson Era in American Science, 1870-1930,” took place from 10/28/1987 to 10/29/1987, and included presentations on the history and philosophy of science by America’s leading historians in science and technology, as well as a keynote address by author Daniel Kevles. To round out the month of October, the last symposium of the Michelson-Morley Centennial Celebration, entitled “Modern Physics in America,” took place from 10/30/1987 to 10/31/1987. More than 1,000 people attended this symposium, and it included lectures by several Nobel Laureates: Hans A. Bethe, Philip W. Anderson, Arthur L. Schawlow, Ivar Giaever, Murray Gell-Mann, and Kenneth G. Wilson.

For more information about the Michelson-Morley experiment, and the Michelson-Morley Centennial Celebration, please consult the University Archives. In addition, the blog post, Namesakes – Morley Chemical Laboratory and Edward W. Morley, provides a brief biography of Edward W. Morley, and includes a link to more information about the Michelson-Morley experiment.

Written by Julia Teran

Posted on Recollections from the Archives by Helen Conger at 05:00 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events and Activities

March 21, 2014

Current Projects

The following is a list of websites we have created since graduating from CWRU in 2001.

Family Travel at InACents.com - A website helping families save money on the cost of travel. We search out the latest deals to save you and your family on the cost of travel. In addition, we visit all kinds of destinations and attractions, and highlight the pros and cons. We always travel with our children, providing a diverse experience for the user.

CPFoodBlog - After visiting Cedar Point amusement park for years, there was a distinct gap of information when it came to dining with the park. The CP Food Blog highlights all of the eating establishments inside Cedar Point, including menus, prices, photos, locations, tips, and reviews.

Today, the CPFoodBlog has become the leading source for information and news on all Cedar Fair amusement parks including Canada's Wonderland, California's Great America, Carowinds, Cedar Point, Dorney Park, Kings Dominion, Kings Island, Knott's Berry Farm, Valleyfair, and Worlds of Fun.

We encourage our readers to interact via social media and share their #CedarPointFood pictures.

Glamping in the United States at Glorified Camping - After getting turned onto the luxurious world of upscale camping, also known as glamping, we set out to create a directory of all the available properties within the United States.

Garden and Home Show Directory - After visiting the Cleveland Home & Garden show for years, we wondered what other garden and home shows there were in the area. The problem was we were not able to find one, comprehensive list of all the garden and home shows in the United States and Canada. So GardenandHomeShows.com is a directory, broken up by States, that list all of the current shows around the country.

Our love for Jimmy Buffet and an island lifestyle encouraged us to purchase sites associated with some of Jimmy's songs, including Pascagoula Run and Mermaid in the Night.

We continue to purchase domain names and develop them as time and energy permit. Please consider checking out our sites and adding us to your social media brands.

Interested in creating your own website? Contact us, as we can get you set up.


Posted on Wide Open Space's Online Journal by Justin Dietz at 10:56 PM | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged:

January 16, 2019

Ballots and Bullets: Black Power Politics and Urban Guerrilla Warfare in 1968 Cleveland

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Local author, attorney, and historian James Robenalt will discuss the roots of the violent uprisings in Cleveland in 1968 (Hough Riot, Glenville Shootout, etc.) and the political aftermath. Cleveland was a uniquely important city in the civil rights movement and hosted critical speeches by Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X (whose “Ballots or Bullets” speech was first delivered here), and Senator Robert F. Kennedy, who spoke of the “Mindless Menace of Violence at the City Club.”

Location: Kelvin Smith Library, Dampeer Room, 2nd Floor
Date & Time: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 | 4:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Reserve Your Spot Today: http://cglink.me/r450631

This event is co-sponsored by Kelvin Smith Library, the Social Justice Institute, Political Science Department, and the Sociology Department.

Posted on KSL News Blog by Corina Chang at 12:34 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events & News @KSL

January 16, 2019

The Correct Way to Request a Book Using ILLiad

This is a fairly important matter that has been hinted at here and there throughout this blog, but it is worth emphasizing in its own right...

* First of all, if we already own a circulating copy in the KSL collections (or in those of another CWRU campus library) that is not currently on loan to another user, you should not need to request it on interlibrary loan--check our online catalog first.

* If you cannot find a local copy in any of the university libraries, please check OhioLINK (and SearchOhio) for available copies that you can have retrieved directly from an academic (or public) library within the State of Ohio.

* Failing these first two prerequisites, you can then proceed to requesting the title using your ILLiad account.

* Select the "Book" form from the "New Request" section of your Main Menu during your logon session, fill in at least all of the "required" fields and submit your request.

* Music scores and complete conference proceedings should also be requested using the "Book" form--as these are normally published items, they can be cited in the same way as ordinary books.

* Alternatively, you may select "Report", "Thesis" or "Other (Misc. Loan)", if any of those forms more specifically apply to the (usually unpublished) item type you may require.

What NOT to do...

* By all means, never, ever use the "Book Chapter" form to sequentially request each and every individual chapter within a single book, or even a sizeable portion of the entire item in question--this is a gross and blatant violation of Copyright Law, even if the book happens to be fairly old.

* When using the "Book Chapter" form, please keep in mind that the rule on copying portions of many books stipulates a maximum of 15% of the total page length of the entire item; this limit should not be exceeded, even accounting for multiple request submissions from the same title.

* The "Conference Paper" form is intended specifically for research papers presented at conferences, meetings, symposia, etc., and should not be used to request entire published proceedings.

* Do not use the "Other (Misc. Loan)" form to request anything other than loans of special items (such as audio-visual media, microfilms, journal issues and volumes, etc.) or to request journal or newspaper articles (for which you should instead use the "Journal Article" form).

Well, that about covers all I wanted to say this time around. As always, hope this has been helpful.

Questions about ILLiad or interlibrary loan? Contact Kelvin Smith Library ILL staff at 216-368-3463 or 216-368-3517, or e-mail us at smithill@case.edu.

Posted on Carl's ILLiad Blog by Carl Mariani at 01:34 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Policies | Recommendations | Services

January 10, 2019

A More Robust Kelvin Smith Library Search Engine

Search Kelvin Smith Library’s collections for your next project. At the top right corner of the library’s main page we have implemented a stronger more robust search engine that will search across CWRU libraries their books, journals, newspapers, and other holdings.

Use the “Search the library collections” box in the upper right corner of the library.case.edu website, or access the search page directly by using this exact URL: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?authtype=ip,uid&custid=s8481523&profile=eds&groupid=main

Have questions or problems to report? Contact Shelby Stuart, sxs1827@case.edu

Posted on KSL News Blog by Corina Chang at 10:29 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events & News @KSL

January 10, 2019

OpenAthens Will Replace VPN for All Off-Campus Access

Your access to library databases and resources on and off-campus has just gotten easier. Very soon, OpenAthens will replace VPN for all off-campus access. OpenAthens is the library’s new authentication system. It will require no action other than signing in with the network ID and password when prompted.


For more information, contact Shelby Stuart, sxs1827@case.edu

Posted on KSL News Blog by Corina Chang at 10:28 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events & News @KSL

January 10, 2019

New Safari Books Online Platform

Kelvin Smith Library’s new Safari Books Online platform is now live. The new platform offers more content and greater functionality, including:
- No user limits. You will no longer be turned away when others are using the same item.
- 40,000 new books and videos
- Mobile app (https://www.oreilly.com/online-learning/apps.html)

Access to the library's electronic resources can be found at: https://researchguides.case.edu/databases

Questions? http://library.case.edu/ksl/ask

Posted on KSL News Blog by Corina Chang at 10:26 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events & News @KSL

July 25, 2018

Helpful Links Now in Your ILLiad Menu

In our eagerness to aid you with using interlibrary loan services, or to guide you toward alternate strategies that offer more expedient access to research materials, we have furnished our ILLiad workspace with several convenient directional links.

When you log into your account, you will notice the left-hand column with the header "Main Menu", which is ever-present in your main page and in all other request form and display table pages that are part of the regular ILLiad site. If you scroll down to the bottom, you will see a section of options, labelled "Resources".

Some of these links will be familiar, such as our own online catalog, OhioLINK, electronic journals and research databases. The three most recently added to the list are the following:

* Summon -- This portal is designed to explore through numerous databases accessible in our library's vast pool of resources, all in a single sweep. It is also customizable to your preferred search strategy, along various parameters. Summon is also accessible directly on the Kelvin Smith Library main website page. *Please see "NEWS FLASH!" update, below.

* Google Scholar -- This popular search engine is particularly useful for verifying article citations, and for determining open access in conjunction with browser extensions available from Open Access Button, Unpaywall and the like. For more information on how this can work together with (or in lieu of) interlibrary loan, please see my blog entry from September 26, 2017.

* Open Access Button -- One of many recommended new applications that work with your browser to assist in locating articles legally available, free of charge. It can help to find one or more versions of an article along the publication process--sometimes even the final published edition. It can also contact authors to place a research request on your behalf, if no version of an article is yet available.

Although it is not currently included in the menu (in the interest of space constraints), we also suggest you check out the more sophisticated OASheet, from the folks at Open Access Button. This version is capable of locating possible open access versions and then sending a list of the repository links directly to your e-mail address.

Another resource of possible interest, but not currently in the ILLiad menu is the HathiTrust site, which can also be found in our list of Research Databases. This cooperative offers access to digitized versions of books, monographs and other various publications, available from numerous collections worldwide--all in one place.

Just another note--all the external links appearing in the ILLiad Main Menu "Resources" section are set to open up in a new tab or window, depending on your browser specifications.

If this has been of any help, then I've succeeded in my mission. Good luck with your research!

Got questions for Kelvin Smith Library ILL staff? Contact us by phone at 216-368-3463 or 216-368-3517, or by e-mail at smithill@case.edu.

Continue reading "Helpful Links Now in Your ILLiad Menu"

Posted on Carl's ILLiad Blog by Carl Mariani at 09:39 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Citations | Features | Recommendations

January 01, 2019

Online Courses to Take in the New Year

Originally posted on OpenCourser

With each new year is a chance to start fresh. Whether you believe in new year resolutions, now’s the time try new habits, explore new ideas, and set new goals and aspirations.

One way to push on these fronts is to learn something new. You might even develop skills and knowledge that can help with your career.

Learn with online courses to achieve results

Online courses are a great way to learn from because:

  • Most present information in a way that’s easy to absorb
  • You get to learn from acclaimed instructors who hail from top institutions
  • They’re designed to help you develop skills and knowledge that you can use

These courses are modeled after traditional classes, but are far more innovative, bringing in technology to keep learners engaged. They’re also flexible, so if you come upon a course that turns out to be a snoozefest or one that’s too difficult, there’s nothing preventing you from finding a new course.

One last note: most courses let you take parts of them for free, so you can learn from them even if they list a price. You only pay if you want a chance to earn a certificate or if you want to access content that’s behind a paywall.

So what will you learn?

As we round the corner into 2019, there’s no shortage of things to learn from online courses.

In the past year, we steadily added new online courses. Today, you’ll find 15,000+ courses in our catalog. 

Put into perspective, you’d need to spend 90 years to finish them all if you made taking courses a full-time job. You won’t be bored either. These courses span thousands of different topics, so you’ll never run out of new material. They also cover a gamut of rigor and difficulty, from gentle intros to highly specialized courses aimed at post-grads.

All of this means you’re free to explore and learn whatever you want to your heart’s content!

Take the first step

If you already have something in mind you’d like to learn, try plugging it into the search bar above. You can also browse for courses by subject.

Don’t know what you want to learn yet? Don’t know where to start looking? Fret not. We’ve put together a curated list of courses that anyone can enjoy. You’ll find those in the next section of this article.

Finally, if you like a course, don’t forget to hit the “heart” button, which adds a course to your list of saved courses. You can always refer back to this list once you’re done browsing.

Our Picks

The courses we’ve chosen below cover a broad range of interests. Most are either at the introductory level or start with the basics and quickly ramp up. None have prerequisites, meaning you don’t need past knowledge to take them. Have a course you’d like to suggest? Shoot us a message via our contact page with the subject “CourseRec”.

Arts & Humanities

  1. Hollywood: History, Industry, Art from University of Pennsylvania, PennX
  2. Modern Art & Ideas from The Museum of Modern Art, Caltech
  3. The Writing Process from Berkeley, UC BerkeleyX, BerkeleyX
  4. The Rise of Superheroes and Their Impact On Pop Culture from The Smithsonian Institution, SmithsonianX
  5. Masterpieces of World Literature from Harvard University, HarvardX
  6. Ancient Masterpieces of World Literature from Harvard University, HarvardX
  7. A Global History of Architecture from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MITx

Business & Economics

  1. The Iterative Innovation Process from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MITx
  2. Financial Markets from Yale University
  3. Design Thinking for Innovation from University of Virginia
  4. Foundations of Positive Psychology from University of Pennsylvania
  5. Game Theory from Stanford University, The University of British Columbia
  6. Effective Business Writing from Berkeley, UC BerkeleyX, BerkeleyX
  7. Inspiring Leadership through Emotional Intelligence from Case Western Reserve University

Foreign Languages

  1. Learn Mandarin Chinese from Shanghai Jiao Tong University
  2. Learn Basic Spanish Vocabulary from University of California, Davis
  3. Online Japanese Beginner Course (All 12 lessons) from Udemy

Health & Wellbeing

  1. The Science of Well-Being from Yale University
  2. Introduction to Psychology from University of Toronto
  3. Stanford Introduction to Food and Health from Stanford University
  4. Child Nutrition and Cooking from Stanford University
  5. Exercise Prescription for the Prevention and Treatment of Disease from Trinity College Dublin
  6. Science of Exercise from University of Colorado Boulder
  7. De-Mystifying Mindfulness from Universiteit Leiden
  8. How to Save a Life: CPR, AED and First Aid from The Disque Foundation
  9. CPR, AED and First Aid Certification Course from Udemy
  10. The Science of Happiness from Berkeley, BerkeleyX
  11. Food for Thought from McGillX

Personal Development

  1. Career Success from University of California, Irvine
  2. Becoming a Successful Job Hunter from LinkedIn Learning
  3. Dynamic Public Speaking from University of Washington

Programming

  1. Automate the Boring Stuff with Python Programming from Udemy
  2. Beginning Python from Treehouse

Science & Engineering

  1. Super-Earths and Life from Harvard University, HarvardX
  2. Antarctica: From Geology to Human History from Victoria University of Wellington, VictoriaX
  3. Structural Materials: Selection and Economics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MITx
  4. Electric Cars: Introduction from Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), DelftX
  5. Animal Behaviour from The University of Melbourne
  6. Animal Behaviour and Welfare from The University of Edinburgh
  7. The Truth About Cats and Dogs from The University of Edinburgh
  8. The Science of Gastronomy from The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
  9. Science & Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to Soft Matter Science (part 1) from Harvard University, HarvardX
  10. Discovering Science: Chemical Products from University of Leeds
  11. Introduction to Algae from University of California San Diego

Social Sciences

  1. Justice from Harvard University, HarvardX
  2. Social Learning for Social Impact from McGill
  3. The Science and Politics of the GMO from Cornell University, CornellX
  4. Forests and Livelihoods in Developing Countries from University of British Columbia
  5. The Challenges of Global Poverty from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MITx
  6. Introduction to Sustainability from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Posted on A Lot of Online Courses by Denton Zhou at 03:30 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: courses | e-learning | moocs | online

December 21, 2018

School of Medicine Mini-History

In celebration of the 175th anniversary of the School of Medicine we have compiled this mini-history. A published history of the School was written for the Centennial in 1943. This mini-history just highlights a few aspects of the School’s 175 year history. The University Archives holds over 860 linear feet of records of the School. Two histories and many articles have been published about the School.

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School of Medicine Harland Goff Wood Building

The School of Medicine was established in 1843 as the Cleveland Medical College. As early as 1834-1835, WRC trustees had considered establishing a medical school.

Names
1843 - Cleveland Medical College
1844 - Cleveland Medical College renamed Medical Department of Western Reserve College (WRC)
1881 - Medical Department of WRC renamed Medical Department of Western Reserve University (WRU)
1913 - Medical Department of WRU renamed the School of Medicine of WRU

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Portrait of Jared Potter Kirtland

Deans
1843-3/1844 and 2/1861-5/1873 - John Lang Cassels
3/1844-2/1846 and 10/1846-2/1861 - John Delamater
2/1846-10/1846 - Jared Potter Kirtland
5/1873-7/1881 - John Bennitt
7/1881-3/1883 - William Johnston Scott
3/1883-9/1893 - Gustav Carl Erich Weber
9/1893-5/1895 - Isaac Newton Himes
5/1895-6/1900 - Hunter Holmes Powell
6/1900-1912 - Benjamin Love Milliken
1912-11/1928 - Carl August Hamann
11/1928-7/1944 - Torald Hermann Sollman
4/1945-8/1959 - Joseph Treloar Wearn
9/1959-8/1966 - Douglas Danford Bond
9/1966-6/1980 - Frederick Chapman Robbins
7/1980-7/1989 - Richard E. Behrman
8/1989-7/1990 - Howard S. Sudak, Acting Dean
7/1990-8/1995 - Neil S. Cherniack
9/1995-6/2002 - Nathan Berger (Interim Dean 9/1995-8/1996)
7/2002-3/2003 - Jerold Goldberg, Acting Dean
4/2003-9/2006 - Ralph I. Horwitz
9/2006-6/2020 - Pamela Bowes Davis (Interim Dean 9/2006-9/2007)

Buildings
While WRC was located in Hudson, Ohio, the Medicial Department was located in downtown Cleveland. The School moved to University Circle in 1924. It was part of the new medical campus which included the new Medical School building (now called the Wood Building), Animal House, Institute of Pathology and University Hospitals' buildings: Lakeside Hospital, Hanna Pavilion, Nurses’ Dormitories (Robb, Mather, Lowman, Harvey). A new Power House was built to service the Medical School buildings and University Hospitals. The dedication of the new Medical School building was in conjunction with the inauguration of Robert E. Vinson as President of Western Reserve University.

1843-1846 rented quarters in the Mechanics Block, southeast corner of Ontario and Prospects streets
1846-1885 Medical School, southeast corner of East 9th Street and St. Clair Avenue
1887-1924 Medical School, southeast corner of East 9th Street and St. Clair Avenue (same site as previous)
1898-1924 Physiological Laboratory, next to main Medical School building at East 9th and St. Clair Avenue
1908-1924 H. K. Cushing Laboratory, East 9th Street and St. Clair Avenue
1924-current use: Harland Goff Wood Building
1924-1943?: Animal House, behind Wood Building
1929-current use: Institute of Pathology
1930-?: Animal House, between Wood Building and first Animal House
1962-current use: Joseph Treloar Wearn Laboratory for Medical Research
1971-current use: Frederick C. Robbins Building (East Wing)
1971-current use: Lester M. and Ruth P. Sears Administration Tower
1993-current use: Richard F. Celeste Biomedical Research Building
2003-current use: Harland Goff Wood Building Research Tower (addition to Wood Building)
Coming in 2019: Health Education Campus

Affiliations
The School has had affiliations with numerous hospitals over the years including: MetroHealth Hospitals System (City Hospital, County Hospital, Cleveland Metropolitan General Hospital, Sunny Acres, Highland View Hospital), Mt. Sinai Medical Center, St. Luke’s Hospital, University Hospitals of Cleveland (including Lakeside Hospital, Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital, MacDonald Hospital, Hanna House, Hanna Pavilion), Veteran’s Administration Hospital, Cleveland Clinic Foundation.

Early Education (taken from Significant Dates in the History of the School of Medicine, Western Reserve University by Frederick C. Waite)
The first classes began 11/1/1843. This first session was 16 weeks. In 1846 two sessions of 16 weeks each was required.

In 1888 graded courses of three years was mandatory. “Required individual laboratory work in Physiology established, the first in the west, and probably the first in the United States.”

In 1895 the optional four year courses established. The first four year class graduated in 1899 (5 men).

In 1901 entrance requirement of three years work in a college of arts and sciences became effective.

01113D1.jpg
Students celebrate at Match Day, 1987

Much has been written about the 1952 Medical School curriculum revision which was widely adopted by other medical schools. For more information you can read the Greer Williams book, Western Reserve’s Experiment in Medical Education and Its Outcome. This curriculum has been revised over time and in 2006 the School introduced the Western Reserve 2 (WR2) Curriculum.

The School of Medicine entered into an agreement with the Cleveland Clinic Foundation in 2002 to form the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of CWRU. This 5-year program trains physician investigators. The first class graduated in 2009.

Absorbed Schools
In 1910 the School absorbed the Medical Department of Ohio Wesleyan University (also known as the Cleveland College of Physicians and Surgeons). The Medical Department of Ohio Wesleyan (1896-1910) was the successor school of several rival Cleveland-based medical schools, including the Charity Hospital Medical College (1865-1869) and the Medical Department of the University of Wooster (1869-1896).

Alumni
Alumni of the School of Medicine have taken their knowledge around the world and served in a number of capacities beyond their role as physicians. Such roles include missionaries, educators, researchers, military, and government service (such as Surgeon General and head of Centers for Disease Control).

01272D1.jpg
Professor J. J. MacLeod with students, ca. 1910

Posted on Recollections from the Archives by Helen Conger at 08:01 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events and Activities

December 21, 2018

KSL Holiday Hours

We have adjusted hours this winter break with the regular 24/7 overnight access schedule returning Monday, January 14, 2019.

Friday, December 21
: Open 8am - 5pm

Saturday, December 22 - Tuesday, January 1: CLOSED

Wednesday, January 2 - Friday, January 4
: Open 8am - 5pm

Saturday, January 5 - Sunday, January 6
: CLOSED

Monday, January 7 - Friday, January 11
: Open 8am - 5pm

Saturday, January 12: CLOSED

Sunday, January 13: Open 12pm - 8pm
Closes at 8pm. NO overnight services

Monday, January 14: Return to Regular Semester schedule. Opens 8am

Posted on KSL News Blog by Corina Chang at 12:32 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events & News @KSL

December 11, 2018

KSL Holiday Closure & ILL Services II

Once again, Case Western Reserve University (including Kelvin Smith Library and all other campus library locations) will be closed for business over the holiday break. This time around, the closure will extend from Saturday, December 22, 2018 through Tuesday, January 1, 2019. Please pardon me for essentially recycling the content of my blog entry from December 12, 2017 with necessary adjustments, for the sake of efficiency.

Again, you may wonder, how will this impact interlibrary loan services and your use of the KSL ILLiad system during this period? As before, until we resume regular library services on Wednesday, January 2, 2019 you can expect the following under these circumstances--

There will be...

* No processing of newly submitted loan or copy requests.
* No processing of renewal requests.
* No processing of electronic deliveries requiring staff mediation; those supplied by trusted senders will still be sent through automatically.
* No staff re-submission of requests for electronic deliveries where incorrect or incomplete articles have been unintentionally supplied by trusted senders.
* No manual courtesy e-mail notifications (e.g., pick-up reminders and blocked account notices); automated e-mails (overdues, electronic deliveries) will still be sent out.
* No receipt processing of pending ILL book loans and no sending of loan pickup notifications.
* No real-time check-in of returned ILL books left in the outdoor book-drop, and no suspension of automated overdue e-mail notifications -- so you may still receive notices, even though you have "physically" returned the items.
* No unblocking of accounts having loans two weeks or more past due, until items are checked in after the closure.
* No scanning and electronic delivery of articles from internal collections for special status users.
* No replies from ILL staff to e-mail or phone inquiries.

In summary, nothing can or will take place that requires ILL library staff to be present and on duty at KSL.

We will resume processing accumulated new requests and other transactions in intermediate process statuses, as well as responding to e-mail or voicemail inquiries, beginning Wednesday, January 2, 2019, in the order in which they were received and as time and available staffing permit.

To make the best of this situation, we recommend that by Friday, December 21, 2018 (well before 5:00 PM) you plan to...

* Pick up any loans still being held at the KSL Service Center, especially if the due date falls within the library closure period.
* Return any loans with a due date falling within the closure period, especially if they cannot be renewed.

...And even further in advance, please plan to...

* Submit new copy requests at least two days before the closure period, to increase the chances of receiving electronic deliveries in timely fashion; otherwise, new requests may not get processed or filled until after the closure.
* Request renewals (where eligible) for any current loans at least two days before the library closure; if this is still more than five days prior to the original due date, you may need to contact ILL staff by phone or e-mail (before December 20, 2018) to have this done manually.
* Submit new loan requests, especially if you have just returned a copy previously borrowed which cannot be renewed but will be needed again in the immediate future.

Also, remember that most of our supplier libraries are also on break during roughly the same time, and may not be processing ILL requests or shipping out items during this heavy volume period for the postal system and commercial couriers. This is especially relevant with regard to borrowing theses and dissertations from other academic libraries. They, likewise, are often non-suppliers while their affiliated granting institutions are closed between academic sessions, and are usually the sole holdings for a particular thesis or dissertation title. Therefore, processing of some thesis requests may need to be delayed even later than January 2, 2019.

If you have forgotten your ILLiad password, please use the "Forgot Password?" feature on the main logon page. ILL staff will not be available to change your password manually during the closure period.

Our best advice -- simply enjoy your time off, and wait until the new year to start using ILLiad services once again. As always, we hope this is helpful.

Here's wishing you all a safe and pleasant holiday break, and a productive return for the coming Spring 2019 Semester.

Got questions about interlibrary loan? Contact Kelvin Smith Library ILL staff at 216-368-3463 or 216-368-3517, or e-mail us at smithill@case.edu.

Posted on Carl's ILLiad Blog by Carl Mariani at 04:33 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Policies | Recommendations | Services

December 13, 2018

Now Accepting Submissions for KSL Book Collecting Contest

bookcollectingcontest.jpg

Do you collect books or manuscripts or other materials found in libraries? What does the collection say about you? If you have a collection of 10+ books/materials that share a unifying theme, enter Kelvin Smith Library’s Book Collecting contest for your chance to win $1000!

Participants need to submit a 500-1500 word essay describing the theme of their collection along with an annotated bibliography of their books to be considered for one of the following prizes:

1st Place: $1000
2nd Place: $500
3rd Place: $250

Check out the contest page for more information: https://researchguides.case.edu/book-collecting

Posted on KSL News Blog by Corina Chang at 07:18 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events & News @KSL

December 12, 2017

KSL Holiday Closure & ILL Services

As you may have already heard, the university (and subsequently the Kelvin Smith Library) with be closed for business from Saturday, December 23, 2017 through Monday, January 1, 2018. So, you may ask, how will this affect interlibrary loan services and your use of the KSL ILLiad system during this period? Well, until we resume regular library services on January 2, 2018, here's what you can expect under the circumstances--

There will be...

* No processing of newly submitted loan or copy requests.
* No processing of renewal requests.
* No processing of electronic deliveries requiring staff mediation; those supplied by trusted senders will still be sent through automatically.
* No staff re-submission of requests for electronic deliveries where incorrect or incomplete articles have been unintentionally supplied by trusted senders.
* No manual courtesy e-mail notifications (e.g., pick-up reminders and blocked account notices); automated e-mails (overdues, electronic deliveries) will still be sent out.
* No receipt processing of pending ILL book loans and no sending of loan pickup notifications.
* No real-time check in of returned ILL books left in the outdoor book-drop, and no suspension of automated overdue e-mail notifications -- so you may still receive notices, even though you "physically" returned the items.
* No unblocking of accounts having loans two weeks or more past due, until items are checked in after the closure.
* No scanning and electronic delivery of articles from internal collections for special status users.
* No replies from ILL staff to e-mail or phone inquiries.

In summary, nothing can or will take place that requires ILL library staff to be present and on duty at KSL.

We will resume processing accumulated new requests and other transactions in intermediate process statuses, as well as responding to e-mail or voicemail inquiries, beginning January 2, 2018, in the order they were received and as time and available staffing permit.

To make the best of this situation, we recommend that by Friday, December 22, 2018 (well before 5:00 PM) you plan to...

* Pick up any loans still being held at the KSL Service Center, especially if the due date falls within the library closure period.
* Return any loans with a due date falling within the closure period, especially if they cannot be renewed.

...And even further in advance, please plan to...

* Submit new copy requests at least two days before the closure period, to increase the chances of receiving electronic deliveries in timely fashion; otherwise, new requests may not get processed or filled until after the closure.
* Request renewals (where eligible) for any current loans at least two days before the library closure; if this is still more than five days prior to the original due date, you may need to contact ILL staff by phone or e-mail (before December 22) to have this done manually.
* Submit new loan requests, especially if you have just returned a copy previously borrowed which cannot be renewed but will be needed again in the immediate future.

Also, remember that most of our supplier libraries are also on break, and may not be processing ILL requests or shipping out items during this heavy volume period for the postal system and commercial couriers. This is especially relevant with regard to borrowing theses and dissertations from other academic libraries. They, likewise, are often non-suppliers while the affiliated granting institutions are closed between sessions, and are usually the sole holdings for a particular thesis or dissertation title.

If you have forgotten your ILLiad password, please use the "Forgot Password?" feature on the main logon page. ILL staff will not be available to change your password manually during the closure period.

Our best advice -- simply enjoy your time off, and wait until the new year to start using ILLiad services once again. As always, we hope this is helpful.

Here's wishing you all a safe and pleasant holiday break, and a productive return for the coming Spring 2018 Semester.

Got questions about interlibrary loan? Contact Kelvin Smith Library ILL staff at 216-368-3463 or 216-368-3517, or e-mail us at smithill@case.edu.

Posted on Carl's ILLiad Blog by Carl Mariani at 12:12 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Policies | Recommendations | Services

November 29, 2018

Trivia Night at the Library

TriviaNight.jpg

It's the last KSL Game Night of the semester! This time we're finishing the semester with a game of trivia. Each member of the winning team will receive a $10 Amazon gift card.

If you don’t have a team (up to 6) no worries ... we’ll match you up with other trivia pros when you arrive OR you can play solo! For those who don't want to participate in Trivia Night, the usual board games will be put out in the Dampeer Room (KSL 2nd floor).

Date: Thursday, December 6, 2018
Location: Kelvin Smith Library, Classroom 215 on the 2nd floor
Time: 7pm Registration

Register your spot on the CampusGroups Events Page: http://cglink.me/r399852

Questions? Please contact Kelvin Smith Library administration at KSL-mail@case.edu or at 216-368-2992.

Posted on KSL News Blog by Corina Chang at 12:37 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events & News @KSL

November 26, 2018

Kelvin Smith Library to Discontinue RefWorks

After careful consideration, the Kelvin Smith Library has made the decision to discontinue campus-wide institutional subscription to the RefWorks citation management tool. RefWorks user account activity has declined steadily in the past several years, with a 50% drop in active users in just the past two years. Given the high cost-per-usage, RefWorks no longer represents a sustainable, cost-effective investment in the Library’s support of CWRU’s teaching, learning and research activities.

All CWRU RefWorks accounts will be closed on December 31, 2018. Data in these accounts will not be available after this date. All RefWorks citation data from CWRU user accounts must be backed up and/or transitioned to another citation management application before December 31st.

KSL is prepared to provide full support for all CWRU RefWorks users needing to extract and secure their Refworks data, and transition to a new citation manager. Other citation management applications are readily available (some for free) with very comparable functionality. Going forward, KSL will provide user support for three of these applications - Zotero, Mendeley, and EndNote.

Please see the online guide (https://researchguides.case.edu/citation-management) for comparisons of these applications, as well as procedural details for the citation data backup/transfer process. The citation data backup and transfer processes are relatively quick and easy, and KSL staff will be on hand to help RefWorks users complete this process.

Inquiries, questions and consultation requests can be directed to any of the following KSL staff members:

Mark Eddy (Zotero): mark.eddy@case.edu | 216-368-5457
Schedule an appointment: https://case.libcal.com/appointments/markeddy

Daniela Solomon (EndNote): Daniela.Solomon@case.edu | 216-368-8790
Schedule an appointment: https://case.libcal.com/appointments/daniela

Yuening Zhang (Mendeley): yxz508@cae.edu | 216-368 5310
Schedule an appointment: https://case.libcal.com/appointments/yuening

Posted on KSL News Blog by Corina Chang at 02:57 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events & News @KSL

November 13, 2018

A Few Words About Password Complexity & Your ILLiad Account

It has been common logic for some time that security is an important issue with regard to one's internet activities, and as such it has been considered standard procedure to expect users to regularly manage passwords to their online service sites. Although a case could be made to apply this reasoning to library services (such as interlibrary loan and document delivery) as well, we have never made it a crucial point to enforce any standards when creating, changing or re-setting your ILLiad password.

We have always encouraged using secure character strings, but have never made any particular requirements mandatory. We do, however, highly recommend (on a purely voluntary basis) the following oft-repeated suggestions...

* 8 to 13 characters in length.
* Include at least one each of the following: uppercase letter, lowercase letter, numeral, non-alphanumeric character (such as "#", "$", "%", "&", "?").
* Avoid using words or names in English or any other language.

For those of you "free spirits" who still insist on using names or regular words, here are some suggestions on how to disguise or camouflage them in practice...

* A name like "Mary Jane" could instead become "m@Ry|&n3".
* Words like "violin bows" could be re-cast as ">i0LjnBo3$".

These examples actually fulfil the three guidelines above, as well. Now that I've put them out there, I recommend of course that you make up your own.

It has also been suggested that you can use "sentence" strings, of the sort which you alone might conceive (and remember more easily), such as "mycatisblue". In fact, using this character string backwards, as "eulbsitacym", might work even better if you're so inclined. An argument for this kind of thinking is put forth in the following somewhat dated article: Do Sentences Make Better Passwords? Have a look, and judge for yourself.

As for passwords you definitely shouldn't use, here are a few: "1234", "abcd", "ill" (especially not for your ILLiad account).

You may also be aware that CWRU UTech currently provides its own Password Security Page, to assist you with your own campus network account use. This also serves as a good source for further advice and recommendations on passwords in general, and certainly would be relevant for ILLiad or any other online service site which you may use. Keep in mind that the location of this page is subject to change at any time--I assume no responsibility for the stability of this link.

Please be apprised that in an upcoming version of ILLiad, you will be required to update your password upon entering your login session. At the point when this upgrade has officially been put in place, you will be directed to the "Change Password" form in your account rather than to your main page. You will then need to enter your current password as well as a new password (twice), before proceeding any further.

You will not need to be concerned about any password security requirements, but you will on the other hand not be able to re-use any previous passwords either. From then on you will be prompted in the same way to change your password periodically, after a number of days yet to be determined--most likely every 180 days.

As always, we hope this is helpful, and prepares you for what is to come in the near future.

Questions or concerns about ILL or ILLiad? Please feel free to contact the ILL staff at KSL by phone at 216-368-3463 or 216-368-3517, or by e-mail at smithill@case.edu.

Posted on Carl's ILLiad Blog by Carl Mariani at 10:16 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Features | Policies | Recommendations

November 09, 2018

Armistice Day: Commemorating the Centennial of the End of World War I

This weekend the world commemorates the centennial of the end of World War I. The “Great War” ended at the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month (11/11/1918). We would like to take this opportunity to remember the service of university personnel during the war.

Both Western Reserve University (WRU) and Case School of Applied Science (CSAS) established Student Army Training corps units on campus. In addition to the SATC unit, over 1,000 men and women from WRU - faculty, staff, trustees, alumni - served the war effort in some capacity: from trustee Newton D. Baker who was U.S. Secretary of War, to Winifred Campbell, College for Women graduate, who served as a nurse at Base Hospital No. 31 in France, to Harland L. Sherman, Adelbert College class of 1916, who was a communication officer in France, to Dr. George W. Crile, Medical School faculty member, who headed Base Hospital No. 4 - the Lakeside Unit in France. The university published a War Service Roster summarizing the service of men and women of WRU.

CSAS also published a War Service Record. This publication summarized the war-related activities of the academic departments, such as the school for Marine Engineers conducted by the Mechanical Engineering Department for the U. S. Shipping Board. This program trained 319 operating engineers for service in the Merchant Marine. The publication also recorded the civilian and military service of over 600 faculty members, alumni, students, and faculty. For instance, Professor Dayton C. Miller served the Scientific Commission of National Research Council and the Army Ordnance Department while Jerold Henry Zak, class of 1913, served in the U. S. Army Ambulance Service.

WRUWarServiceRecord261.jpgCITWarServiceRecord260.jpg


After the war, WRU held a service 6/8/1919 in honor of those university members who died in service during the war. On 11/11/1921 a program was held in Amasa Stone Chapel to dedicate a memorial tablet honoring the deceased. This tablet still hangs in the chapel. Those honored include: Robert Dickson Lane, William Benjamin Crow, Paul Frederick William Schwan, Orville Russell Watterson, Ellory Justin Stetson, Pontius Gothard Cook, Harold Sharp Layton, Charles Scott Woods, William Walter Burk, Henry Burt Herrick, Allen James Excell, Charles Shiveley Brokaw, Joseph Charles Monnier, Renselear Russell Hall, George Albert Roe, Walter Hay Akers, Fred Carl Rosenau.

CSAS installed a tablet in honor of those faculty, alumni, and students who served with the armed forces during the war, 1914-1918. Over 600 names were listed. Those who died were indicated with a star. This tablet was dedicated at commencement on 5/26/1921. Newton D. Baker gave the commencement address, War and the College Man. The tablet was originally displayed for commencement and then installed on the first floor of the Case Main Building.


Records concerning Western Reserve University and Case School of Applied Science during World War I are available for use in the Archives.

Posted on Recollections from the Archives by Helen Conger at 10:03 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events and Activities

November 05, 2018

Elsevier Showcase at Kelvin Smith Library

Elsevier will help you support breakthrough research and serendipitous moments of discovery, keeping you a step ahead:

- Monitoring and analyzing the world’s research output.
- Publishing content that reflects the most pressing needs of the research community.
- Moving research forward by inspiring new ideas for investigation.
- Explore unfamiliar subject matter, branch into related disciplines and test novel theories— giving rise to those serendipitous moments of discovery that are often key turning points in research.

eBooks Overview | 9:00 am - 10:00 am | Kelvin Smith Library LL06 B/C | http://cglink.me/r437411

Knovel | 10:00 am - 11:00 am | Kelvin Smith Library LL06 B/C | http://cglink.me/r437414

How to Get Published | 11:30 am - 12:30 pm | White 411 | http://cglink.me/r437385

Scopus Upgrades | 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm | Kelvin Smith Library LL06 B/C | http://cglink.me/r437415

How to Get Published
| 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm | Kelvin Smith Library LL06 B/C | http://cglink.me/r437389


Posted on KSL News Blog by Corina Chang at 11:38 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events & News @KSL

December 20, 2012

ILLiad Login vs. Single Sign-On

Just a reminder that your ILLiad Login is not the same as your CWRU Single Sign-On. When you set up a user account in Kelvin Smith Library's ILLiad system (or that of your respective service point library system), you create your own UserName and Password at that time. If you so choose, these can be the same as the CWRU Network ID Initials (e.g., 'abc12'), and the password you normally use when logging in with it. For the sake of uniformity, we recommend that you do use your Network ID also as your ILLiad UserName (unless another registrant has somehow already claimed the same character string for that purpose). However, for security reasons we suggest you use a different password, as you would with any other various site with which you have registered.

The university UTech staff have provided a Password Help page (also linked to the Single Sign-on page), which offers suggestions on properly creating a secure password string. We recommend you refer to it for creating your ILLiad password as well. You are certainly free to use the same password in both the CWRU network and ILLiad, if you so choose, but in that case, remember to change your password regularly. Keep in mind, then, that whenever you change your network password it does not automatically change your ILLiad password simultaneously. You will need to log into your ILLiad account separately and select the 'Change Password' option under the 'Tools' section of your 'Main Menu' to do this.

If you have questions or concerns regarding your ILLiad login or password, please contact us by phone at (216) 368-3517 or (216) 368-3463, or e-mail us at smithill@case.edu.

Posted on Carl's ILLiad Blog by Carl Mariani at 08:37 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Policies | Recommendations