This is an aggregation of all of the recent blog posts of the Case Blog system. The entries are in reverse chronological order according to each entry's last modified date. Persons with questions regarding Planet Case or the Blog system can check the FAQ or email us at blog-admin@case.edu.

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March 27, 2017

Remembering 1997-1998: March 27, 1998

Observer_1998-03-27_Absurder.jpg

The March 27, 1998 Observer continued the long-standing tradition of an April Fool's special section. The Absurder’s breaking news: “Zaremba declared president of CWRU; Pytte refuses to resign... Neo-Luddites balmed for high tech crime spree... Mutant cockroaches storm Crawford... Survey shows: nerds abound at CWRU...”

More conventional headlines included:
• Krzesinski elected as new USG president
• Steiner elected new editor
• Dodd forms committee on academic ethic policy
• Gurarie fences in NCAA Championships
• Tennis team shocked by division rivals
• Baseball team splits doubleheader against Thiel Tomcats

And here's the entire issue: The Observer, 3/27/1998

This is one in a series of weekly blog postings describing what was happening at CWRU, as covered by The Observer, during the years many of the Class of 2020 were born.

Posted on Recollections from the Archives by Jill Tatem at 01:05 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events and Activities

March 22, 2017

Timely Comments on Choosing the Correct ILLiad Request Form

This is a topic I've explored thoroughly in past entries. Once again -- and in response to various recent occurrences -- I am briefly covering some of the more common "misapplications" encountered in the selection of ILLiad forms...

* Thesis or Dissertation? -- use the "Thesis" request form, not the "Book" form; granting institution (in "College or University") and year done also greatly appreciated.

* Music Score? -- use the "Book" request form; you to not need to use the "Other" form, and certainly NOT the "Journal Article" form.

* Journal Volume? -- use the "Other" request form; do NOT use the "Journal Article" form as if you were requesting a reproduction of the entire piece.

* Microfilm or Audio-Visual Media? -- use the "Other" request form -- do NOT use the "Journal Article" or "Book" forms.

* "Other" Request Form -- to be used only for special "returnable" loans (see above), NOT for any type of reproduction.

* "Journal Article" Request Form -- just that, "journal articles" only, and please fully cite as well as possible (journal title, volume, issue, year, pages). NOTE: Book chapters and conference papers have their own specialized request forms.

* "Monographs" that actually turn out to be catalogued reprints of journal articles, book chapters or conference papers -- please use the "Journal Article", "Book Chapter" or "Conference Paper" request form (based on the original citation), rather than the "Book" form or any other loan-type request form. (This may require a little extra research on your part, but it will save us all time and effort in the long run.)

"Never mind the why and wherefore" -- I'm just trying to keep this short and sweet (for a change). As always, hope this was helpful.

Questions for ILL staff at Kelvin Smith Library? We're available by phone at 216-368-3463 or 216-368-3517, or by e-mail at smithill@case.edu.

Posted on Carl's ILLiad Blog by Carl Mariani at 03:13 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Citations | Features | Recommendations

March 20, 2017

Remembering 1997-1998: March 20, 1998

The March 20, 1998 Observer editorial urged, “Implement online registration soon.” Columnist John D. Giorgus opined, “Current physical education standards are a waste.”

Observer_1998-03-20_p12.jpg
Music critic, Ryan Smith offered his own rating system.

Headlines included:
• Merger may increase train traffic in UC four-fold
• Residence hall restructuring announced for 1998-1999
• Brooten appointed Dean of Nursing
• Eyes On: Urban Asylum
• Dickerson and Wiechers name Truman finalists
• Senior Week fun planned
• Boogie Benefit to fund renovations
• GE, OSCS, CSU form tutoring program
• Take Back the Night protests violence against women
• Makin’ Music: CWRU students to sing and strum at Spot
• CBS scores hit with new “George & Leo” sitcom
• Shakespeare feast to be served tomorrow night at Harkness Chapel
• Creed’s debut album swings and misses with too much hard rock
• Hessler Street Fair poetry contest announced
• Spartans win UAA Championships
• Baseball team starts season on down note
• CWRU holds First Annual Winter Indoor Ultimate Tourney
• CWRU to leave NCAC and become a full time UAA member

And here's the entire issue: The Observer, 3/20/1998


This is one in a series of weekly blog postings describing what was happening at CWRU, as covered by The Observer, during the years many of the Class of 2020 were born.

Posted on Recollections from the Archives by Jill Tatem at 02:32 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events and Activities

March 19, 2017

First Year Experience Innovation Awards

The Kelvin Smith Library (KSL) has partnered with Credo Reference to create two awards recognizing First Year Experience Innovation. The inaugural awards will be given at the KSL hosted Personal Librarian & First Year Experience Conference in spring of 2018.

Formal Press Release: March 16, 2017

See award details and apply at: http://mktg.credoreference.com/fye-innovation-award

Posted on KSL News Blog by Brian Gray at 09:07 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events & News @KSL

March 17, 2017

CWRU’s First International Students

In 2012 7% of Case Western Reserve University’s first-time, first-year students came from outside the U.S. In 2013, Beijing was the hometown of the most members of the entering undergraduate class. By 2016, international students represented 16% of first-time, first-year students. [1]

As an archivist, my default reaction to these kinds of changes and trends is to wonder about historic antecedents. So I set out to identify the first international student from each of our schools. One of the obstacles is that the university recorded far less data about students in the 19th and early 20th centuries than we do now. That means fewer sources to consult, but less certainty about results. So, the necessary disclaimer is that I am identifying the first documented international student in each of our schools.

Because our first reference priority is responding to user requests, my international student quest has been confined to the occasional slow reference periods. So this search will be an ongoing process with additions to this blog entry as additional students are identified.

Here is what is known so far:

CWRU’s first documented international student was George Hall, from England, who entered Western Reserve College in 1839. He attended either one or two years (sources differ). He did not graduate from WRC, but received his A.B. from Princeton in 1845, according to alumni directories.

Case School of Applied Science’s first documented international student was Shin-ichi Takano, from Tokyo. Mr. Takano appears in the 1897/98 and 1899/1900 student rosters as a graduate student. He is also listed in the Case Differential 1901, the student yearbook for academic year 1899/1900, as one of ten graduate students. He is listed in the 1900 commencement program, receiving the M.S. in chemistry. The title of his thesis is The Chemical Composition of the Japanese Petroleums. Fortunately, the Archives has a copy of this thesis. Unfortunately, Mr. Takano does not appear in Case alumni directories, so we know nothing of his life after he graduated.

Case School of Applied Science’s first documented undergraduate international student was Alexander Maurice Orecchia, from Sao Paulo, Brazil. Mr. Orecchia appears in the 1900/01 and 1901/02 student rosters. He appears in the 1902 Commencement program, receiving the B.S. in electrical engineering. Case students at that time wrote an undergraduate thesis. The title of Mr. Orecchia’s thesis is Influence of Salts in Solution on the Ampere Efficiency of an Electrolytic Cell. The Archives also has a copy of this thesis. Case 1927, 1958, and 1964 alumni directories list Mr. Orecchia as living in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

04774D1.jpg
Alexander Maurice Orecchia, 1902

[1] The class statistics are from Institutional Research's First-Year Class Profile. Information about student hometowns was reported in the August 20, 2013 Case Daily.

Posted on Recollections from the Archives by Jill Tatem at 03:17 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: People

March 09, 2017

Time's Running Out!! Deadline Extended!

This is the last week to submit an entry for the CWRU Student Book Collecting Contest with a chance to win cash prizes! Note: the contest has been extended until Friday, March 17th so you have a couple more days to enter for your chance to win and move on to the National Collegiate Book Collecting Contest!

Go to http://researchguides.case.edu/book-collecting for more information and submission guidelines. Good luck to all!

Download file

Book Collecting image.JPG

Posted on KSL News Blog by Gina Midlik at 08:23 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged:

March 10, 2017

KSL's Spring Break Hours

Spring Break is here! KSL and Cramelot Cafe will be open, but with limited hours. 24/7 also takes a break and will return Sunday, March 19th at 11:30pm. Enjoy your week!


KSL HOURS
Friday, 3/10: Close at 8pm. NO 24x7 services. NO card swipe access.
Saturday, 3/11: CLOSED
Sunday, 3/12: CLOSED
Monday, 3/13 to Friday, 3/17: 8am - 5pm. NO 24x7 services. NO card swipe access.
Saturday, 3/18: CLOSED
Sunday, 3/19: Regular hours resume at 12pm


CRAMELOT HOURS
Saturday 3/11 & Sunday 3/12: CLOSED
Monday 3/13 to Friday 3/17: 8am to 2pm
Saturday 3/18 & Sunday 3/19: CLOSED
Monday 3/20: Regular hours resume at 11am


Spring Break.JPG

Posted on KSL News Blog by Angela Sloan at 03:47 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events & News @KSL

March 10, 2017

World War I - summary of CIT campus activity in 1917

The United States officially entered World War I on 4/6/1917. This galvanized actions at Case School of Applied Science (CSAS) and Western Reserve University.

President Charles S. Howe
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In the CSAS President’s Annual Report for 1916/1917, President Charles Howe wrote:

“For some time previous to the declaration of the war there had been a great deal of interest among our students in military matters but it had not crystallized into any being. the National Defence Act [sic] of June 1916 made it possible for students in college to form voluntary organizations and for the government to send military officers to institutions where such organizations existed. Engineering students are always very busy with their college work. The demands upon them during the four years of undergraduate life are very much more severe than upon the students in academic colleges. It is, therefore, not surprising that only a few students were willing to take upon themselves work that was not required. After this situation had been explained to the Board [of trustees] a committee was appointed, consisting of two members of the Board and the president of the faculty [Howe]. The committee was asked to thoroughly investigate the question of military drill and the establishment of such military drill as a requirement in Case. The committee had several meeting one with the Secretary of War in Cleveland and another with him in Washington, the latter at his invitation.

“An effort was made to have a military unit established but it was not successful because the number of officers in the army was limited and all of them were needed in the new army about to be raised. We were, therefore, informed that our application was on file - that it would receive consideration just as soon as it seemed possible to supply an officer but that until that time nothing could be done. The committee also endeavored to find out whether it would be possible for us, with our engineering and scientific equipment, to train men as officers for particular scientific departments of the army, or rather, departments where engineering skill is especially needed, as, for instance, in the engineer corps, the ordnance department, the signal corps, etc. Our suggestions were very coldly received by the heads of bureaus but seemed to please the Secretary of War very much. He could, not, however, force the heads of bureaus to attempt work of this kind without their hearty consent and so we have never offered the use of our laboratories to the government.

“As a result of the work of this committee the Trustees, on March 3rd voted that military drill be made compulsory in Case School of Applied Science in accordance with the terms of the National Defense Act of June 1916, and that such drill begin at the opening of the college year 1917-18. It was also voted to increase the length of the college year by one week in order to partially make up for the time which would be taken from studies by the military exercises. Previous to this time, however, military marching had been taken up in the gymnasium as a substitute for gymnasium work. This was carried on under the direction of Professor Adamson who was a captain in the Reserve Corps and by the gymnasium instructors who very willingly took the necessary time to acquaint themselves with the drill manual. At first this work was merely called military marching but as soon as the trustees had taken formal action its title was changed to military drill. The Cleveland Grays kindly loaned us a hundred rifles which they were not using and we secured the services of Captain Lynn, the Adjutant of the Fifth Regiment, Ohio Infantry, as the military instructor. There was little if any objection on the part of the students, even after drill was given for two, three and four hours a day.

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Student Army Training Corps drilling, 1917-1918

“As soon as war was declared and the government had determined to establish officers’ training camps in various sections of the county [sic], the college work was badly disorganized. The greatest excitement prevailed. Almost every student in college wanted to go to the camps and my office was besieged from morning until night by the men who wished to secure recommendations. Of course many of the students were too young to be allowed to enter the training camps but in the upper classes the majority of them were over twenty-one and hence were eligible. A comparatively small number of seniors applied for admission to the camps because they hoped to be admitted to the engineering department of the army. About sixty of the students were appointed to the training camps, the number being about equally divided among the senior, junior, and sophomore classes, although three or four freshmen were admitted. One of the freshmen received the highest rank given to a Case man at the conclusion of the first training camp and is now adjutant of his regiment.

“The training camps were not the only opportunities for college men, and various other military activities were open to them, and the call from some of which seemed to be irresistible. Some entered the aviation corps, some went into the mosquito fleet, some became wireless operators, several went to France with the ambulance corps, and one or two took up Y.M.C.A. work with the army.

“Then came the call to the farm. Although we are situated in a large city some of our students come from the country and there was a very great demand on the part of their fathers to have them go home as soon as possible to assist in the farm work. In other cases young men thought that the farm offered them their best field for service. The faculty, therefore, agreed to excuse on the first of May, all of those who could get positions on farms and to give them credit for the balance of the year’s work if they continued the farm work until September first. About thirty students took advantage of this ruling of the faculty and left college on approximately May first.

“Several of the faculty left before the end of the college year, taking advantage of the action of the Trustees whereby they were given leave of absence during the period of the war and continued under fully salary until such time as the government would provide pay for men in the department which they wished to enter.”

Read WRU President Thwing's summary.

Posted on Recollections from the Archives by Helen Conger at 01:23 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events and Activities

March 06, 2017

New Exhibits @ KSL!

Take a minute and view two new exhibits in KSL's first floor gallery through June 2017!

A Thousand Words,, derived from the idiom a picture is worth a thousand words, explores the Black American student experience in the photographic record of CWRU.

Oh My Stars! shows images from a rare treatise on astronomy and astrology, available in KSL Special Collections.

Introductorium in Astronomiam, originally an Arabic manuscript from the 8th century, was translated into Latin in the 12th century, printed on a press in the 15th century, and then digitized in the 21st century. Oh My Stars! juxtaposes 15th century illustrations of celestial bodies with modern imagery of starfields reinforcing the continual cycle of information. What’s your sign??!!

Posted on KSL News Blog by Gina Midlik at 11:25 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged:

March 06, 2017

Remembering 1997-1998: March 6, 1998

The March 6, 1998 issue of The Observer announced its contest to predict the Oscar winners. Nominees for Best Picture were Titanic, Good Will Hunting, L.A. Confidential, As Good as it Gets

Observer_1998-03-06_p11.jpg

Other Headlines:
• Pytte to retire in 1999
• Neff discusses CWRUnet at open forum
• Eyes On: Peer Helpers
• Students prepare for competition in Malta
• Eustis to lead library
• CEC wraps up week of engineering fun
• Schmiedl tells of her “Personal Memory of King”
• Moonwalkin’ Man: MR CWRU talks about the pageant, his Michael Jackson impression...
• Fencers are undaunted by competition
• Hoopsters drop out in quarterfinals
• Wrestlers compete at regionals
• Spartans to compete in nine-day UAA tournament in Florida
• Tennis team prepares to take on NCAC opponents

And here's the entire issue: The Observer, 3/6/1998

This is one in a series of weekly blog postings describing what was happening at CWRU, as covered by The Observer, during the years many of the Class of 2020 were born.

Posted on Recollections from the Archives by Jill Tatem at 01:21 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events and Activities

February 27, 2017

Remembering 1997-1998: February 27, 1998

The February 27, 1998 issue of The Observer Focus section asked, “What makes a great movie?” The section examined films “which have had a unique impact on today’s releases and culture.”

In other headlines: RHA captures “School of the Year” award

Observer_1998-02-27_p1.jpg


• Network problems plague students on weekends
• Eyes On: Adopt-A-Grandparent
• Students win Seiberling moot court competition
• Medical school alum confirmed as surgeon general
• ACM team competes in international competition
• Recial tensions promote violence in essayist’s world
• Free jazz ensemble to make music in Strosacker Auditorium Tuesday night
• Big Star was the best of “power pop”
• Still not convinces metal music is worth listening to? Read why Six Feet Under makes it well-worth it
• “World’s best” to perform at Harkness Chapel
• Meggitt dreams of order this weekend at Mather
• Wrestlers continue to regional competition
• Men’s basketball closes season on the upside
• Hoopsters eliminated from conference play
• Track teams place third at Baldwin-Wallace
• Men’s volleyball continues to top EIVA
• Hockey club battles for top division spot
• Fencers compete in UAA championships

And here's the entire issue: The Observer, 2/27/1998

This is one in a series of weekly blog postings describing what was happening at CWRU, as covered by The Observer, during the years many of the Class of 2020 were born.

Posted on Recollections from the Archives by Jill Tatem at 09:41 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events and Activities

February 24, 2017

Namesakes - Lemperly Bookplate Collection

One hundred years ago Western Reserve University received a gift of 540 bookplates, some engravings and books from Mr. and Mrs. Paul Lemperly in memory of their daughter, Lucia, who had attended the College for Women and had passed away in 1915. This gift was placed in the custody of the Adelbert College Library and became known as the Lemperly Bookplate Collection.

Lucia Lemperly was born 2/7/1886 in Cleveland. She graduated from West High School in 1903 and entered the College for Women with the freshman class of 1907. She pursued the Modern Language course. In January 1905 Lucia withdrew on account of health reasons. She died 5/20/1915 at the age of 29. Her father was a wholesale druggist and a collector of bookplates and books about bookplates.

Lucia Lemperly.jpg
Lucia Lemperly

Soon after the gift was received, the bookplates, designed by Edwin Davis French, were exhibited in the English Library at the College for Women in Clark Hall. The exhibition was held from 2/10-2/17/1917. To commemorate this exhibition from 100 years ago, the University Archives and Special Collections have displayed some of the bookplates, copper plates, and books in an exhibit case in the University Archives. The exhibit is available during the months of February and March.

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1917 Exhibit invitation

Prior to the gift, Lemperly’s collection was exhibited at the Case Library in 1899 and the Rowfant Club in 1911.

French was a renowned American engraver. He was born in North Attleboro, Massachusetts in 1851. After studying at Brown University for 2 years, he became chief of the engraving department of the Whiting Company (silversmiths) in New York. In 1893 he designed and engraved his first bookplate for his sister-in-law, Helen E. Brainerd. He soon changed his career to copper engraving (leaving Whiting in 1894). He died in 1906.

The Lemperly Bookplate Collection contains bookplates designed by other artists as well as those used by celebrities of the day. Mr. Lemperly and Mr. French kept up a regular correspondence and the letters from French to Lemperly have been bound and are available in Special Collections along with the bookplates and related books.

Posted on Recollections from the Archives by Helen Conger at 08:53 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: People | Things

February 24, 2017

Cloudbleed

Biggest information security news this week

Posted on Jeremy Smith's blog by Jeremy Smith at 01:04 PM | Comments (0)

Entry is tagged: mainblog

February 23, 2017

Freedman Fellows to Present @KSL

On Tuesday, March 7th Kelvin Smith Library will host an afternoon of presentations by the 2016 Freedman Fellows: Elliot Posner, Associate Professor of Political Science, Shannon Sterne, Assistant Professor of Dance, and Gillian Weiss, Associate Professor of History.

During this event, the Fellows will discuss their research and how the Freedman Fellows program provided support. The program is funded by the Freedman Fellows Endowment by Samuel B. and Marian K. Freedman, the Kelvin Smith Library and the College of Arts and Sciences. This annual award is given to full-time CWRU faculty whose current scholarly research projects involve some corpus of data that is of scholarly or instructional interest, involve the use of digital tools and processes, and have clearly articulated project outcomes in support of digital scholarship.

The event is free and open to the public; attendees may stay for all or part of the event. Tours of the Center for Digital Scholarship will be available preceding the event, beginning at 11:30am. A tour of the Jewish View @ CWRU Exhibit in the Hatch Reading Room will be available at 3:15pm. Lunch will be served. For more information, and to register, click HERE.

Posted on KSL News Blog by Gina Midlik at 02:52 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged:

February 21, 2017

Reminder About Case Account Number & ILLiad Account Setup

This is an issue that keeps cropping up every now and then, so I will clarify it once again...

Whenever you register as a new user in the KSL ILLiad site (or in the ILLiad site of any of the other three campus library systems), you are directed to the 'First Time Users' link on the main logon page, which further links to the registration form. While entering your profile information, you are asked to enter your 'Case Account Number' as an integral piece of data allowing the library to verify your current eligibility for ILL services. Originally, it was your Social Security Number that was required at this point, but for legal reasons this usage has no longer been permitted. Members of the CWRU community are now assigned a unique identification number in its place for various administrative purposes.

You will notice at this point that KSL's ILLiad registration form conveniently provides a link to the Case Account Number Lookup page. All you need do here is enter your CWRU network ID and password, and Voilà! -- there it is in real time. Just copy and paste it into the corresponding data field, and continue entering the rest of your user information to complete your registration. Once you have created your account, you will never again need to re-enter this number into your profile.

Just a note to Faculty, Staff and Student Employees -- this is NOT to be confused with your Case Employee Number. This is the most common misconception when signing up in ILLiad. Both numbers are similar in appearance, but have entirely separate functions.

Hope this has been helpful.

For assistance with ILLiad and Interlibrary Loan concerns, please contact the Kelvin Smith Library ILL staff by phone at 216-368-3463 or 216-368-3517, or by e-mail at smithill@case.edu.

Posted on Carl's ILLiad Blog by Carl Mariani at 10:17 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Policies | Recommendations

February 21, 2017

Remembering 1997-1998: February 20, 1998

The February 20, 1998 issue of The Observer reported on the College Republicans’ week-long celebration. During “Nuts for Regan Day” they passed out peanuts to honor Ronald Reagan. The week ended with a gala at Wade Commons.

Observer_1998-02-20_p5.jpg

Headlines:
• Krzesinski disqualified from USG exec board
• Parking garage, more housing planned for UCI
• George Wallace to perform at CWRU
• Eyes on: Society of Women Engineers
• Share the Vision searches for new Alma Mater
• Zins explores “Where has King’s message gone?”
• Cleveland Museum of Art exhibits rare treasures from Vatican collections
• Inter-religious council to explore on-campus religious diversity
• The wonderful world of engineering to be celebrated next week
• Ballroom dancers step, swing and trot to awards circle at third annual CWRU competition
• Spartans surge for Sudeck’s 300th victory
• CWRU hosts Claude B. Sharer tournament
• Defeat takes CWRU women to the brink
• Track teams compete at Oberlin College
• Archery Club hosts Ohio Indoor Championships
• Spartan Spotlight: Elie Gurarie, senior fencer

And here's the entire issue:The Observer, 2/20/1998

This is one in a series of weekly blog postings describing what was happening at CWRU, as covered by The Observer, during the years many of the Class of 2020 were born.

Posted on Recollections from the Archives by Jill Tatem at 01:43 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events and Activities

February 14, 2017

Remembering 1997-1998: February 13, 1998

The day before Valentine’s Day, the February 13, 1998 issue of The Observer announced Musicians of CWRU would celebrate the day with a release party for their new CD, featuring 70 minutes of original music. The event was free; the CD cost $3.00.

In other news:
• Krzesinski and Oyster named to USG exec board
• Taft wins Winter Carnival
• Plans make Euclid Avenue more “pedestrian-friendly”
• Eyes On: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
• CSE announces the merger of three departments
• Legendary bluesman to be honored in September
• Student Voices: What is your opinion of the death penalty?
• Mr. CWRU contest raises over $1600
• Orpheus descends on Eldred this weekend
• “NewsRadio” is the next great sitcom
• Wellness Week to feature educational programs
• CWRU hosts first ever indoor track meet
• Hoopsters ready to spark in final countdown
• Spartans unable to snap out of 10 game streak
• Spartan Spotlight: Sharon Sanborn, senior swimmer

Observer_1998-02-13_p6.jpg
Civil Engineering’s high school Model Bridge Building Competition

And here's the entire issue: The Observer, 2/13/1998

This is one in a series of weekly blog postings describing what was happening at CWRU, as covered by The Observer, during the years many of the Class of 2020 were born.

Posted on Recollections from the Archives by Jill Tatem at 01:49 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events and Activities

February 08, 2017

The Student Book Collecting Contest is underway!

Are you a collector? Do you love books? KSL has a contest that may be right up your alley. We're holding a Student Book Collecting Contest where you can enter to win cash prizes. All students of CWRU (graduate and undergraduate) are eligible and the Grand prize is $1,000! Enter by March 15th for your chance to win and move on to the National Collegiate Book Collecting Contest.

Go to http://researchguides.case.edu/book-collecting for more information and submission guidelines. Good luck to all!

Download file

Book Collecting image.JPG

Posted on KSL News Blog by Angela Sloan at 04:18 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events & News @KSL

February 06, 2017

Remembering 1997-1998: February 6,1998

The February 6, 1998 issue of The Observer began a three-part series examining University Circle improvements. The first article took a ten-year look at CWRU’s 1988 master plan.

Observer_1998-02-06_p1.jpg

Other Headlines:

• Over 850 vote for USG
• Forum discusses learning
• Eyes On: College Republicans
• CWRU S.T.O.P. gets makeover as CWRU Telefund
• Case engineers beware! Physics III is still required
• Alpha Epsilon Pi gets charter at CWRU
• Cleveland art, artists subject of web project
• Planet E opened at History Museum, fails to impress college visitors
• Reggae fest to honor Bob Marley Saturday
• Nine local photographers showcased in new exhibit
• Swimmers ready to challenge the NCAC
• Spartans sweep UAA with three conference titles
• Spartans drop a pair heading into final conference play
• Men’s basketball surrenders to tough NCAC rivals

And here's the entire issue: The Observer, 2/6/1998

This is one in a series of weekly blog postings describing what was happening at CWRU, as covered by The Observer, during the years many of the Class of 2020 were born.

Posted on Recollections from the Archives by Jill Tatem at 01:42 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events and Activities

February 04, 2017

test

testing blog server 2017-02-04

Posted on fuzzyblog by James Nauer at 09:09 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Work

January 31, 2017

World War I - summary of WRU campus activity in Spring 1917

The United States officially entered World War I on 4/6/1917. This galvanized actions at Western Reserve University (WRU) and Case School of Applied Science (CSAS).

President Charles F. Thwing
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In the WRU President’s Annual Report for 1916/1917, President Thwing wrote:

“The most outstanding feature of the second part of the academic year is found in the war. Until the declaration of a state of war with Germany was made by the President, the interest of the students in the world-conflict was not great. With the making of the declaration, interest was quickened. The interest of the student community, however, was constantly much greater than that of the general. In this condition, it was the endeavor of the Faculty - an endeavor which still abides - and of the administrative officers, first , to make and maintain the devotion of all students to their immediate duties, and secondly, to recognize with fullness and propriety their relation to their larger fellowship, national and international. The reconciliation and co-working of these two aims has not always been easy, but I think it may be justly affirmed that these two objects have been well ordered and fittingly co-ordinated.

“In respect to the great conflict, the Faculty of Adelbert College have passed these votes:

‘That every possible encouragement by given to the immediate inauguration of voluntary military training among the students, that steps be taken to secure military instructors at once for the remainder of the college year, and that we recommend to the Board of Trustees the appropriation of funds necessary to secure such instructors;

‘That some form of systematic physical training under the direction of the department of Physical Training be required of all students for the remainder of the college year, with the view to making our students physically fit for military service;

‘That in the event of a declaration of war and a call for volunteers by the President of the United State, it be suggested to the Athletic Association of the University that inter-collegiate spring sports be abandoned;

‘That it be recommended to the Trustees that students who enlist and are accepted by the government for service in any branch of warfare be given credit for the remainder of the year;

‘That Commencement exercises of a simple nature be held May 10th or 11th for all Seniors in good standing;

‘That compulsory military training be adopted in Adelbert College for the ensuing year;

‘That for the balance of the present college year the executive committee be authorized to grant leave of absence with credit only to students enrolled in military and Red Cross organizations, and that such leave begin upon receipt of mobilization orders, unless in the judgment of the executive committee earlier leave ought in fairness to be granted in individual cases in order to permit students to visit their homes or to adjust their personal affairs before mobilization;

‘That the executive committee be authorized to reduce the examination period to the shortest time possible consistent with the best interests of the students and the College.’

The significance of these actions is made more impressive by reason of the great number of the students of Adelbert College and the Law School who have enrolled, and also of the formation and departure of the Lakeside Hospital unit. The number of men, who have entered the army, navy, and other service, is in Adelbert College one hundred and sixty-two, and in the Law School fifty-four. The staff of the School of Medicine is represented in the Lakeside Hospital Unit by twelve men.

“These bare figures are replete with meaning. They represent the supreme fact that in the hour of the crises of the nation, or of the nations, the college youths are the first to respond. This University is simply repeating in its way the experience through which American Colleges, both north and south, passed at the time of the Civil War and also through which the universities of England, of France, and of Germany, are passing in the course of the present conflict. This result is not surprising. The highest motives, the noblest purposes, make the most important and strongest appeal to men of the worthiest type.”

00832D1.jpg
Officers of the first American contingent to arrive in Europe, General Hospital No. 9 (Lakeside Hospital unit)


Spring 1917 activity on the Case campus will appear next month.

Posted on Recollections from the Archives by Helen Conger at 08:11 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events and Activities

January 30, 2017

Remembering 1997-1998: January 30,1998

The January 30, 1998 issue of The Observer made it clear that CWRU had winter on its mind. The schedule for Winter Carnival included snow flag football and snow volleyball. The Outdoor Wilderness Association planned a winter hike at the Metroparks North Chagrin Reservation. And the Fun Photo of the Week depicted a skier with the caption, Caution: Bare Spots. (I cannot describe this. You will have to look for yourself.)

Observer_1998-01-30_p1.jpg
Alumnus Fred D. Gray speaks at MLK, Jr. Convocation

Other headlines:
• Trustees announce tuition increase of 3.4 percent
• Asian financial crises affect CWRU students
• Eyes On: Outdoor Wilderness Adventures
• Vote for USG February 3
• Sophomores: sick of CWRU? Found out how to get away
• See new lands with Junior Year Abroad
• Features: Peter Pan soars into Palace Theater; Rapper Ma$e delivers a “fresh” debut album with upbeat, groovy songs
• Cain Park to hold theater auditions
• Sports: Wrestlers take third in Thiel tournament; Swimmers stay strong in the face of defeat; Men attempt to recover from six game slide; Hoopsters begin to slide
• Spartan Spotlight: Gloria Hsieh, senior swimmer

And here's the entire issue: The Observer, 1/30/1998

This is one in a series of weekly blog postings describing what was happening at CWRU, as covered by The Observer, during the years many of the Class of 2020 were born.

Posted on Recollections from the Archives by Jill Tatem at 03:43 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events and Activities

January 27, 2017

Breathe Sessions at KSL

For Today!
Students are welcome to participate in “Breathe,” a mini interactive relaxation series, on Fridays this semester from 1 to 1:30 p.m. in Kelvin Smith Library. Two programs will be offered as part of the series: sun salutation yoga and brief mindfulness meditation.

Today's session is "Sun salutation yoga and brief mindfulness meditation."

Dates and Details for the February sessions:
Feb. 3: Sun salutation yoga and brief mindfulness meditation
Feb. 10: Sun salutation yoga and brief mindfulness meditation
Feb. 17: Mindfulness relaxation
Feb. 24: Sun salutation yoga and brief mindfulness meditation
Details for the remainder of the sessions will be released throughout the semester.

ConnectCWRU, University Health & Counseling Services and the Kelvin Smith Library are sponsoring the series.

For additional information, contact Patricia Sinclair at pxs97@case.edu or 216.368.3040 or Marel Corredor-Hyland at mxc277@case.edu or 216.368.2990.

Posted on KSL News Blog by Angela Sloan at 10:18 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events & News @KSL

January 26, 2017

The Human Library@KSL

For Today!
Stop by KSL during Community Hour and "check out "our Human Library!
This event is part of the 2017 MLK Celebration week and the theme of “Hope in Solidarity."

The Human Library is a place where real people are on loan to readers. Volunteer “books” are people from all walks of life who are willing to share their tales about having been stigmatized or stereotyped due to race, religion, sexual orientation, class, gender identity, lifestyle choices, disability, etc.

Readers can “check out” the “book” to have open, informative discussions to challenge those prejudices and create a personal dialogue about issues that are often difficult, challenging and stigmatizing. To go from "Solitude to Solidarity."

This event is open to all and participants do not need to be affiliated with CWRU. Light refreshments will be provided at the event.

Posted on KSL News Blog by Angela Sloan at 03:13 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events & News @KSL

January 25, 2017

CWRU’s Monuments Men

Theodore Sizer and Lester K. Born, former faculty members, were both members of the Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives (MFAA) subcommission during World War II. The work of this commission to protect monuments and other cultural treasures from destruction was highlighted in the 2014 motion picture film, Monuments Men.

Theodore Sizer served as Lecturer in Art at Adelbert College of Western Reserve University (WRU) in the 1924/25 and 1925/26 academic years. He had received the S.B. cum laude in Fine Arts from Harvard University. Sizer also was Curator of Prints and Oriental Art at Cleveland Museum of Art while in Cleveland, beginning that role in 1921. After leaving Cleveland, he became an Associate Professor of Art History at Yale University. While on the Adelbert College faculty Sizer taught An Introduction to the Fine Arts. See his Monuments Men biography.

Born_Lester_FSMMyDiary_1933_yearbook.jpg
Lester K. Born

Lester K. Born served as Assistant Professor of Classics at Flora Stone Mather College of Western Reserve University 1930-1934. He received the A.B. in 1925 and the M.A. in 1926 from the University of California. He was also a graduate student in Political Science in 1926/27. He served as Graduate Scholar in Classics at Princeton University 1927-1928, receiving the M.A. in 1928. He earned the Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 1929. Before serving on the faculty at WRU, he was Assistant Professor of Classical Languages at Ohio State University for the 1929/30 academic year. Born taught a variety of Latin classes at WRU over his 4 years. These classes included: Introductory Latin Composition; Horace, Odes and Epodes, Catullus and Martial; Intermediate Latin Composition; Cicero, De Senectute, Seneca, Apocolocytosis, Pliny, Selected Letters, Selections from Latin Poetry; Advanced Latin Composition; Roman Private Life; LIvy; Roman Elegiac Poetry; Translation at Sight; and The Teaching of Latin. Born’s faculty colleagues in the Classics Department included Rachel L. Sargent, Clarence Bill, Robert S. Rogers, and Kenneth Scott. See his Monuments Men biography. One of Born's published accounts of his service appeared in The American Archivist, July 1950 issue.

Posted on Recollections from the Archives by Helen Conger at 08:08 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: People

January 17, 2017

Remembering 1997-1998: January 16,1998

In the first issue of the new semester, The Observer editors offered some New Year’s resolutions to CWRU: implement computerized registration, allow juniors to live off campus, end the mandatory meal plan, implement standardized training for academic advisors, administrative offices should not close during the lunch hour.

“If CWRU can follow just one or two of the above suggestions, the student population would be most grateful.”

Headlines in the January 16, 1998 issue included:
• Clinton declares MLK Jr. Day to be day ‘on’ service
• Student sexually assaulted on Case Quad New Year’s Day
• Sororities kick off rush
• Eyes On Downhill Ski and Snowboard Club
• ZBT Hosts Casino Night
• Dunbar speaks at CWRU
• New deans come and go with the new year
• WSOM’s Cowen prepares for Tulane
• CWRU professor questions Martian nanobacteria
• Letters to the editor: Kwanzaa deserves to be considered “religious”; Kwanzaa belongs in Holiday Festival; Treat students with respect
• Exhibit celebrates African-American heritage
• Sports: Spartans thrive as coach nears milestone; New year brings new hope for Spartans; Wrestlers compete in Heidelberg tournament; Spartan Spotlight: Joe Dietrich, civil engineering senior, wrestling & track

Observer_1998-01-16_p20.jpg
Fun Page Photo of the Week: snowflakes taste good…

And here's the entire issue: The Observer, 1/16/1998

This is one in a series of weekly blog postings describing what was happening at CWRU, as covered by The Observer, during the years many of the Class of 2020 were born.

Posted on Recollections from the Archives by Jill Tatem at 01:49 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events and Activities

January 12, 2017

Title: Remembering 1997-1998: The Journalists

Last semester many of our blog postings described what was happening at CWRU during the 1997/98 academic year, as covered by our student newspaper, The Observer. We chose 1997/98 because those are the years many of this year's freshmen (Class of 2020) were born, We’ll continue that project in the spring semester.

The focus of those highlights has been on the stories, rather than the story-tellers. So, I’m taking this opportunity to salute the 1997/98 fall semester Observer staff who were responsible for this important record of the university’s history.

Observer_1997-12-05_p6.jpg
Masthead from the December 5, 1997 issue of The Observer.

Posted on Recollections from the Archives by Jill Tatem at 04:32 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: People

January 12, 2017

Journal Titles: Abbreviations & Title Changes -- A Few Examples

This month I decided to offer a little commentary on this topic, which has profound implications on the expedient and efficient processing of article requests by ILL staff. A lot of what I discuss is inspired by "real life", so I have drawn from some recently submitted ILL transactions. The article author, article title and pagination in each of these cases is irrelevant, and there is no intention on my part to compromise any of our users' anonymity or confidentiality in the process of this "disquisition".

* Our first example is--

Journal Title: PDA J Pharm Sci Technol
Volume: 39
Issue: 4
Month: July-August
Year: 1985

Since the title as originally cited proves to be a slightly ambiguous abbreviation, an internet search is in order. This now reveals that the citation with its full title is determined to be...

"PDA Journal of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology 39.4 (1985)"

...compliments of Google Scholar (and from the publication's own website, no less). A further search of online bibliographic records for this title yields...

PDA journal of pharmaceutical science and technology
Publ History Vol. 48, no. 4 (July/Aug. 1994)-

Well? Something's not quite right here, so then we further note in this record...

Continues Journal of pharmaceutical science and technology 1076-397X...

Searching this alternate title, we now find...

Journal of pharmaceutical science and technology : the official journal of PDA
Publ History Vol. 48, no. 1 (Jan./Feb. 1994)-v. 48, no. 3 (May/June 1994)

Yet, again? This doesn't exactly fit, either. So next we see...

Continues Journal of parenteral science and technology 0279-7976...

And search...

Journal of parenteral science and technology
Publ History Vol. 35, no. 1 (Jan./Feb. 1981)-v. 47, no. 6 (Nov./Dec. 1993)

...which turns out to be the actual journal title at the point of the cited article's publication (volume 39, 1985--at two full degrees of separation from the original journal title as given by the "authoritative" source of the citation). And this is the correct one to which ILL staff need refer when processing the request, in order to determine appropriate supplier libraries for matching available volume holdings.

An interesting note, that this title further...

Continues Journal of the Parenteral Drug Association 0161-1933...

Journal of the Parenteral Drug Association
Publ History Vol. 32, no. 1 (Jan.-Feb. 1978)-
Ceased with: v. 34 in Nov.-Dec. 1980

...which also further...

Continues Bulletin of the Parenteral Drug Association.....

Bulletin of the Parenteral Drug Association
Publ History Began with: Vol. 1, published in 1946; ceased with: v. 3l, published in 1977

...and that, my friend, is "where it all started".

* Briefly, another illustrative example...

Journal Title: Die Neue Literatur
Volume: 17
Year: 1916

Our initial bibliographic search thus results in...

Die Neue Literatur
Pub History [32. Jahrg., Heft 1] (Jan. 1931)-44. Jahrg., Nr. 3 (März 1943)

Not quite right, eh? Well upon further investigation, we therein note this title referenced...

Continues Schöne Literatur...

...and searching it we find...

Die Schöne Literatur
Pub History 3. Jahrg., Nr. 1 (4. Jan. 1902)-31. Jahrg., Heft 12 (Dez. 1930)

...and there you have it (i.e., where v. 17, 1916 falls).

* And finally, yet another instructive specimen...

Journal Title: Journal of Sedimentary Research
Volume: 45
Issue: 3
Year: 1975

Our preliminary search yields...

Title Journal of sedimentary research
Pub History Vol. 66, no. 1 (Jan. 1996)-

Get the idea? Well then, we further discover that this title...

Continues Journal of sedimentary research. Section A, Sedimentary petrology and processes 1073-130X...
...and...
[Continues] Journal of sedimentary research. Section B, Stratigraphy and global studies 1073-1318...

... thus revealing a previous merger of..
.
Journal of sedimentary research. Section A, Sedimentary petrology and processes
Pub History Vol. A64, no. 1 (1 Jan. 1994)-v. A65, no. 4 (2 Oct. 1995)
...and...
Journal of sedimentary research. Section B, Stratigraphy and global studies
Pub History Vol. B64, no. 1 (15 Feb. 1994)-v. B65, no. 4 (15 Nov. 1995)

Then in both of these cases, each title...

Continues Journal of sedimentary petrology 0022-4472...

...the result of a split, and then yielding...

Title Journal of sedimentary petrology
Pub History v. 1-63; Apr. 1931-Nov. 1993

... wherein falls vol. 45, no. 3, 1975... Bingo!

In the interest of avoiding further elucidation (and the continued long-windedness on my part to which you have been heretofore subjected), I offer you to make of this what you will on your own. Suffice it to say that there's a lot to recommend a little more examination of the accuracy and clarity of article citations, before submitting them as ILL requests.

By the way, a related topic was also recently discussed on October 27, 2015.

Need help with ILLiad and Interlibrary Loan issues? Please contact the Kelvin Smith Library ILL staff by phone at 216-368-3463 or 216-368-3517, or by e-mail at smithill@case.edu.

Posted on Carl's ILLiad Blog by Carl Mariani at 10:37 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Citations | Recommendations

December 29, 2016

Trial: Scientific Style and Format Online

The Kelvin Smith Library is running a trial of the Scientific Style and Format Online, 8th Edition, through the end of April. If you have any feedback, please send it to Brian Gray at bcg8@case.edu.

Trial is live at: http://www.scientificstyleandformat.org/Home.html
*Remember to be on the campus network or using VPN.

Now in its eighth edition, the indispensable reference for authors, editors, publishers, students, and translators in all areas of science and related fields has been fully revised by the Council of Science Editors to reflect today’s best practices in scientific publishing. This fully searchable online edition makes it easy to find the answers you need quickly.

Scientific Style and Format Online also provides convenient tools including information on manuscript preparation and markup, sample correspondence, editorial office practices, and a citation quick guide.
Students, researchers, writers: for help citing sources visit the quick guide to see examples of Scientific Style and Format citation style for common types of sources.

Scientific Style and Format Online includes the popular Chicago Style Q&A, a resource that thousands have found entertaining and informative. The Q&A content is fully searchable along with the content of Scientific Style and Format. Your search queries will return clearly distinguishable results from Scientific Style and Format as well as the Chicago Style Q&A. The Chicago Style Q&A also features monthly polls and interviews of interest to anyone who works with words.

Posted on KSL News Blog by Brian Gray at 01:37 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Trials

December 19, 2016

Pitfalls of Keeping Long-Overdue ILLiad Books

I realize this is a rather somber topic to end the year with, but it seems to become rather timely and apropos at the close of each academic semester. So, here's a short list of caveats...

* Firstly, expect to receive a series of up to four e-mail notifications as the due date approaches: a "Due Soon" reminder (5 days prior--with renewal option), an "Overdue" notice (the day after), a seven-day notice, and a two-week (blocked account) warning notice. Oh, and, by the way, the lender may at any time choose to recall a loaned item--in which case ILL staff will in due course send off a "Recall" notice.

* After two weeks past the due date for any single ILLiad loan, you will have arrived at a "blocked" user status, and will not be able to submit any new ILLiad requests. At this point, look forward to additional reminder notices by e-mail periodically until any and all long-overdue loans are returned and ILL staff thereafter unblock your account.

* Although we do not reckon overdue fines for ILL loans per se, we are obligated to pass on to our patrons any charges incurred for items deemed lost or never returned--once we have received a formal bill for replacement from a lender library. We will normally contact you at this stage, to offer you one last opportunity to make a return and thus avoid such an outcome.

* Once we have been required to compensate a lender for the replacement of an ILL item, it is our prerogative to recoup the cost by adding the commensurate amount as a fine to the patron's main library account. Your balance would then most certainly exceed the $15.00 "good standing" limit, sufficiently leading to the loss of your regular library privileges. This would both affect the borrowing of local and OhioLINK materials and block login access to your ILLiad account.

* Failure to return items generously lent to us can potentially jeopardize our library's good relations with prospective lenders, with whom we previously enjoyed congenial associations. This can easily result in the loss of access to rare materials from valued suppliers, and in turn, potentially diminish our ability to support the research needs of all our users.

Sorry for leaving you with such a "downer" out there as we finish off 2016. On the upside, we guarantee you'll feel much better when you comply with ILL return policies and evade any of the potential negative consequences. With that said, we hope you can look forward to the promise of good fortune in the coming new year.

Questions or comments regarding ILLiad and Interlibrary Loan? Contact the Kelvin Smith Library ILL staff by phone at 216-368-3463 or 216-368-3517, or by e-mail at smithill@case.edu.

Posted on Carl's ILLiad Blog by Carl Mariani at 12:11 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Policies | Recommendations | Services

December 22, 2016

KSL Hours During Winter Break

Kelvin Smith Library has reduced hours during the winter break. The 24/7 services will also take a break until the spring semester begins on Tuesday, Jan. 17th.

For a complete list of the library’s hours over the coming weeks, please visit our website: http://library.case.edu/ksl/aboutus/hours/

Cramelot Cafe will be open today (Dec. 22nd) from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and closed from Friday, Dec. 23rd, until Monday, Jan. 16th. Normal hours for the cafe resume on Tuesday, Jan. 17th.

Posted on KSL News Blog by Brian Gray at 01:42 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: KSL Services & Spaces

December 16, 2016

“Adelbert at last to have Modern Lights - Fight for Electric Lighting System Finally Wins Out”

So read a small headline in the 12/17/1919 issue of The Reserve Weekly. The article read,

“When the fathers of Western Reserve University placed the word, ‘Lux’ on the emblem which has come down to us, they meant it as a motto, but it turned out to be a prophecy. After years of dark and gloomy waiting, lights are now to dispel the gloom that hangs over winter eight-fifteens. No longer will the ponderous brass structures used as chandeliers hang threateningly over the heads of sleepy students, for a new era of electric lights has arrived.

“Promises of lights have come regularly for the last few years, but, this time, wires, fixtures, and numerous electricians prove that the lights are almost here. Most of the wiring is done, so that it will be but a short time before the mere pressure of a button will flood a dark room with light.”

At the 10/13/1919 meeting of the Western Reserve University Board of Trustees, the trustees approved the measure, “Upon the recommendation of the Treasurer, it was voted that the electric light wiring equipment, be completed in the second, third and fourth floors of Adelbert College Building at an estimated cost of $2005.44.”

Posted on Recollections from the Archives by Helen Conger at 08:32 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Places

December 13, 2016

Kelvin Smith Library Faculty Study Space Lottery

Faculty can sign up for the Kelvin Smith Library Faculty Study Space Lottery through Monday, Jan. 16.

These spaces are quiet spaces in which faculty can conduct research and writing, rather than using as an office or meeting space. Faculty members are assigned the spaces for one year.

There are 10 openings for current faculty members on the library’s third floor: five individual rooms and a room shared by five people.

To learn more about the spaces, visit library.case.edu/ksl/facilities/facultystudyspace/.

The sign-up form is available online at: https://goo.gl/8gjncr.

Posted on KSL News Blog by Brian Gray at 08:36 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: KSL Services & Spaces

December 07, 2016

Relax for Finals!

In need of a little relaxation during finals week? On Monday, December 12th from 2-5pm, stop by Bon Appètit’s Create-Your-Own-Tea table on the first floor of KSL [near Cramelot] to make and try your own blend and to learn about the benefits of different types of tea! See you there!

Posted on KSL News Blog by Gina Midlik at 01:32 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events & News @KSL

December 05, 2016

Remembering 1997-1998: Week 13

In its December 5, 1997 issue The Observer issued final grades: B+ to CWRUnet services, C to Aramark, A to WRUW, D- to limited hours at Kelvin Smith Library during Finals Week, A to Engineering and Science Review, A to University Program Board, and more.

Other headlines in this last issue of the semester included:
• Joyce Fitzpatrick to step down as Dean of Nursing
• Federal government announces tax relief to students
• ESS plans move to KSL
• Women’s center planned
• Diversity class discussed
• MaDaCol breaks New Ground this weekend

Special section: Focus on Stress
• ESS works to alleviate stress of finals-stricken students
• Meditation provides means of finals enlightenment
• Simple, relaxing exercises can remove stress
• The Refuge offers asylum from pressures of college
• KSL relieves aggravations of laptop users
• Panhellenic Council helps first-year women deal with stress

And here's the entire issue: The Observer, 12/5/1997

This is the last fall semester weekly blog posting describing what was happening at CWRU, as covered by The Observer, during the year many of the Class of 2020 were born. We’ll pick up again in January with the first issue of 1998.

Posted on Recollections from the Archives by Jill Tatem at 01:43 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events and Activities

November 28, 2016

A Few Assorted "Near-Year-End" Reminders

I just couldn't wait until December to put out another one of these lists of timely ILL-related issues (from my vantage point, at least) -- so, here goes...

* Duplication of OhioLINK loan requests in ILLiad -- We urge you to consider using OhioLINK (including SearchOhio) first. If you have already requested a loan through OhioLINK, please avoid creating an equivalent transaction for the same item in ILLiad. Be aware that ILL staff reserve the right to cancel an ILLiad loan request if copies are simultaneously available in OhioLINK, or if your library record indicates you have already placed a hold on an OhioLINK copy.

* About theses and their availability through interlibrary loan -- Please keep in mind that not all are "created equal", as far as interlibrary loan is concerned. They exist in many formats (print, microfilm, CD-ROM, online, etc.), often but not necessarily related to age (e.g., pre- vs. post-2000), and we may have little influence on which of these we can obtain them in for our users. The availability of theses and dissertations is dependent upon many circumstances, most prominently the diverse policies of granting institutions' libraries or archives. This may involve various restrictions imposed on use (such as "No Renewals" or "Library Use Only"), or to proper crediting in the user's research. Some institutions may not permit theirs to be lent out at all as returnable loans, and may not even agree to provide reproductions. Sometimes the existence of multiple holdings listed by potential lender locations other than the granting institution can alleviate this state of affairs. Often when we are unable to obtain them through regular ILL channels (either as a loan or a reproduction), we suggest that our patrons may need to take the recourse of purchasing a personal copy from UMI ProQuest, British Library EThOS, or possibly other sources. We may also encourage the suggestion of an acquisition of a thesis title for addition to the Kelvin Smith Library's own collections, if justifiable. In any case, please be aware that there is no 100% guarantee that theses can be accessed exclusively through ILL services. It's a real "mixed bag", to be sure--I could go on and on...

* Articles from journals vs. reprints listed as monographs -- Sometimes you may run across an item (usually as the result of an OCLC WorldCat search) which has been catalogued individually by an single lender location, and which is also fully cited within the same bibliographic record as an article from a scholarly journal (including volume, issue, year, pages, etc.). Although you may be tempted to submit your request as if this material is a "borrowable" item, we prefer that you extract (and further verify if necessary) the original citation and simply submit it properly into a journal article (or other "non-returnable") request form instead. This will eliminate unnecessary processing time for ILL staff, since it would not give the mistaken appearance of a "rare" item that is actually much less difficult to obtain.

* Submitting excessive requests simultaneously by the same user and prioritization by ILL staff -- Please keep in mind that if you choose to submit ILL requests in mass quantities concurrently, it can considerably slow the overall processing efficiency of the library staff who handle these transactions. In fairness to our other patrons who only place one, two or maybe three requests at a time, we reserve the right to expedite those transactions in their favor. This practice is at our discretion, and we are always willing to take adequate justification into account to consider acting otherwise, if you expressly state the urgency of your circumstances (preferably in the "Notes" field of your request forms).

* Citing multiple journal articles in the same ILL request -- Due to copyright restriction issues on our part, and to processing and policy issues on the part of most potential lender libraries, we ask that you submit only a single cited item per each of your ILLiad requests for non-returnable materials (i.e., journal articles, book chapters, conference papers). Be on notice that ILL staff again reserve the right to cancel such requests, and require you the patron (yes, you!) to re-submit each cited item in a separate new transaction.

* Music scores and ILL -- These are treated as regular book loans, so please request them using the "Book" request form in ILLiad. There is no need to use the "Other (Misc. Loan)" form, as these are actually routine loan transactions that usually require no special handling. Also, please do not take for granted that we can obtain reproductions (digital or otherwise), as these materials are usually heavily copyrighted. Do not submit a request for a score using the "Journal Article" or "Book Chapter" forms, either -- it is up to the lender library's discretion as to whether they are willing or able to provide as a non-returnable copy, and ILL staff will make the necessary adjustments and conversions to the transaction, as required.

I've pretty much covered all of these concerns in previous entries over the past eight or so years, but they always seem to be worth repeating whenever a particular pattern of patron usage becomes evident. Feel free to search this blog for more detailed information on any of the topics mentioned in the above list, or anything else related to interlibrary loan for that matter. For help with that, see my recent posting from September 22, 2016.

Got questions or comments regarding ILLiad and ILL services in general? Please contact the Kelvin Smith Library ILL staff by phone at 216-368-3463 or 216-368-3517, or by e-mail at smithill@case.edu.

Posted on Carl's ILLiad Blog by Carl Mariani at 04:30 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Citations | Policies | Recommendations

December 01, 2016

Project 562

Come view a new KSL exhibit! In partnership with the Office of Multicultural Affairs, Kelvin Smith Library presents Project 562. Named for the number of recognized tribes, this project is dedicated to photographing contemporary Native Americans in effort to challenge stereotypical perceptions. Project 562 is on view in the Gallery@KSL through January 2017.

Click HERE for more info.

Posted on KSL News Blog by Gina Midlik at 08:50 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events & News @KSL

December 01, 2016

Shakespeare Goes Pop!

View KSL's new exhibit! This summer we asked the CWRU community to share their favorite examples of Shakespeare’s enduring influence on popular culture. Come see the results! Shakespeare Goes Pop! is on view in the Gallery @ KSL through January 2017.
blog_shakespeare-goes-pop.jpg

Posted on KSL News Blog by Gina Midlik at 08:44 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events & News @KSL

November 29, 2016

Namesakes - I. F. Freiberger and Freiberger Library

01983D1 copy.jpg Plans for a new library building were announced as part of Western Reserve University’s 125th anniversary celebration in 1951. Trustees voted to name the new library in honor of Isadore Fred (better known as I. F.) Freiberger in 1953, ground was broken in 1954 and the new building was dedicated 2/5/1956 as the I. F. Freiberger Library Building. The cost of the building was approximately $1.6 million and was designed by Small, Smith and Reeb of Cleveland. Ralph Ellsworth (WRU School of Library Science class of 1931), director of libraries at the State University of Iowa (now University of Iowa), was chief consultant on building plans. Its 80,000 square feet was designed for a capacity of over 500,000 volumes and a seating capacity to accommodate 600 students. The three story building plus basement, at the corner of East Boulevard and Bellflower Road, overlooked the Cleveland Museum of Art and Wade Lagoon. The exterior was of limestone to blend with Severance Hall and the Art Museum. Freiberger Library opened for the Spring semester 1956.

Freiberger Library centralized holdings from the university library housed in Thwing Hall and holdings in other campus buildings (Clark Hall, Harkness Chapel basement, Hitchcock Hall, and the Annex). The plan for the library was a modular design. There were few interior walls to allow flexibility in moving partitions and shelves as needed. Study areas were scattered throughout the shelving areas. Director of university libraries, Lyon Richardson said, “The library may be considered as a great browsing room of four floors. We consider the library not as a place for storing books, but as a place for arranging books and facilities to serve educational principles”

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Interior views of Freiberger Library

I. F. Freiberger, known as Izzy to his parents and Fry to his friends, was born 12/12/1879 in New York City, one of 6 children. His parents moved the family to Cleveland when he was 3 years old. Freiberger graduated from Central High School in Cleveland in 1898. He received his Bachelor of Letters degree from Adelbert College 6/13/1901. (A friend and classmate in high school and college was Winfred G. Leutner, president of WRU 1933-1949). As an undergraduate student Freiberger played on the class baseball team, class football team, and class basketball team. He was also a varsity member of the Reserve basketball team. He served as business manager of The Reserve (yearbook) and was class treasurer his senior year.

02973D1 copy.jpgI. F. Freiberger, ca. 1935

He received the LL.B. in 1904 from Cleveland Law School of Baldwin Wallace College while working at Cleveland Trust Company (where he started work as a clerk upon graduation in 1901). He worked his entire career at Cleveland Trust: Third Assistant Trust Officer (1909), Assistant Secretary (1913), Trust Officer (1914), Vice President (1915), Director (1939), and Chairman of the Board (1941). He married Fannie Fertel in 1903 and they had 2 children, Lloyd and Ruth Mae.

Freiberger was a loyal alumnus and served as a trustee on the Board of Cleveland College (1925-1943), Adelbert College (1934-1941), and Western Reserve University (1941-1967). He was named an honorary trustee 10/5/1967. Reserve awarded Freiberger the honorary Doctor of Humanities degree in 1947. He received the first Distinguished Alumnus Award from the Adelbert College Alumni Association in 1968.

Freiberger was also Chairman of Board of The Forest City Publishing Co., director of the Interlake Steamship Co., Richman Bros. Co., Youghiogheny & Ohio Coal Co., Island Creek Coal Co., and Wyoming Pocahontas Coal & Coke Co as well as other companies. He served on a number of philanthropic and educational boards including Goodrich Social Settlement House, Jewish Community Federation, The Playhouse Foundation and Mount Sinai Hospital. Freiberger received The Eisenman Award on the 50th Anniversary of the Jewish Community Federation, the Cleveland Chamber of Commerce Cleveland Medal for Public Service, and the Distinguished Service Award of the Cleveland Community Chest. The American Heart Association honored him in 1957 with the Award of Merit for Distinguished Service.

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I. F. Freiberger with Distinguished Alumnus Award, 1968

After he died 4/20/1969 the CWRU Board of Trustees honored him with a memorial resolution which read in part,“His friends remember Fry in part for his success and for his leadership, but they remember him especially for his remarkable personal qualities of humility, humanity, and gentleness. He loved his fellow men and was a true friend to literally thousands of people of all ages and from all walks of life. A part of his humanity and warmth was revealed in his happy family life and his devotion to his wife, Fannie Fertel Freiberger, whose death in 1962 ended a most happy marriage of nearly sixty years.”

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Students playing softball on Freiberger Field

Freiberger Library was razed in 1996 after the Kelvin Smith Library (KSL) was completed. The Freiberger Pavilion on the second floor of KSL and Freiberger Field on the site of the old library were dedicated 11/16/1997 and continue to honor I. F. Freiberger’s memory. The portrait which used to hang in Freiberger Library now hangs in Freiberger Pavilion in Kelvin Smith Library.

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I. F. Freiberger portrait, 1955

Posted on Recollections from the Archives by Helen Conger at 07:00 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: People | Places

November 23, 2016

Thanksgiving at Reserve, 1911

The lead story in the 11/28/1911 issue of the Reserve Weekly concerned “Coming Events,” namely Thanksgiving Day and the big game against Case. Despite their best efforts, Reserve lost to Case 9-5 at Van Horn Field.

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See descriptions of Thanksgiving and the traditional Case vs. Reserve game in blog entries from 2010, 2011, 2012, and 2013.

Posted on Recollections from the Archives by Helen Conger at 02:17 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events and Activities

November 14, 2016

Remembering 1997-1998: Week 12

The November 21, 1997 issue of The Observer included this invitation to Gobble, Gobble ‘97. Sponsored by the USG Class Officers, the feast offered international cuisine for the quintessential American holiday.

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In other headlines:
• CES announces last minute curriculum changes
• Winter holidays of three faiths to be celebrated
• Freiberger Field dedicated this weekend
• Where does the money go? Activity fee reviewed
• Frank Gehry to design new Weatherhead building
• CWRU physics professor publishes fourth book
• Expectations high for women’s basketball

And here's the entire issue: The Observer, 11/21/1997

This is one in a series of weekly blog postings describing what was happening at CWRU, as covered by The Observer, during the year many of the Class of 2020 were born.

Posted on Recollections from the Archives by Jill Tatem at 02:26 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events and Activities

November 17, 2016

"Breathe” - A Mini Interactive Relaxation Series for StudentsBreathe” A Mini Interactive Relaxation Series for Students

KSL is hosting "Breathe” - A Mini Interactive Relaxation Series for Students.

1:00 pm - 1:30 pm

  • November 18: Lower Level-06, B&C
  • December 2: Lower Level-06, B&C
  • December 9: Lower Level-06, B&C
  • December 16: Dampeer Room, 2nd Floor

5:00pm – 5:30pm

  • December 12: Dampeer Room, 2nd Floor
  • December 16: Dampeer Room, 2nd Floor

Sponsored by: ConnectCWRU and University Health & Counseling Services and the Kelvin Smith Library.

Contact for additional information:
Patricia Sinclair at pxs97@case.edu or 216.368.3040
Associate Director, Services for Outreach, Prevention and Care for Trauma-affected Students
University Health and Counseling Services

Marel Corredor-Hyland at mxc277@case.edu or 216.368.2990
Diversity, Campus Partners and HR Development Team Leader
Kelvin Smith Library

Posted on KSL News Blog by Brian Gray at 07:45 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events & News @KSL

November 16, 2016

KSL presents...Collection Roadshow!

Countdown to the ABAA National Collegiate Book Collecting Contest 2017

Do you have a collection? Don’t think you’re a collector? Want to be a collector?

Join us for an afternoon of fun and refreshments with Professor Daniel Goldmark, Director of the Center for Popular Music Studies at CWRU, who will present observations on the act of collecting and share examples from his personal collections of sheet music and comic books!

Tuesday November 29th, 2016 at 3 pm in KSL’s Dampeer Room.

Students and attendees are encouraged to bring examples from their own collections.
This event is a kickoff to the KSL Student Book Collecting Contest with a chance for prizes up to $1,000! Winners will be eligible to participate in the Antiquarian Booksellers Association of America’s National Collegiate Student Book Collecting Contest 2017! For more info click HERE.

RSVP to Library Administration @ ksl-mail@case.edu or 216-368-2992.

Posted on KSL News Blog by Gina Midlik at 02:21 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events & News @KSL

October 05, 2016

Congratulations to the Library Resource Lab Winners!

Resource Lab

Resource Lab 2

On September 29, Kelvin Smith Library hosted the Library Resource Lab to showcase many of the science and engineering specialized resources available in the library. In its fourth year, this event has set records with more than175 participants, 11 vendors demonstrating their products and the overall satisfaction of those involved. 

Many participants expressed satisfaction with the event, as it allowed them to discover new resources and learn  ew tricks about familiar ones. Vendors from Elsevier, IEE

E, Springer, Wiley, ACS, SPIE, ProQuest, Gale, JSTOR, ASM International, and American Ceramic Society were also pleased with the experience, already having committed to returning next year.  endors were also impressed with how engaging the students were and the complexity of their questions. Event planners (KSL staff) were happy with the event's educational vibe, the opportunity to interact with so many participants, and the chance to highlight additional library resources and services available on campus.

Courtesy of our generous sponsors, we had two grand prize raffle winners, both BME students: Yuanqi Xie won a mini wireless printer/scanner offered by ProQuest and Lydia Warren won a $50 gift card offered by Springer. Multiple gift cards were also offered as door prizes.

Finally, we’d like to offer a big "thank you" to our sponsors, Elsevier, Wiley, IEEE, ACS and SPIE, and a shout-out to all event participants!

Posted on KSL News Blog by Rachel Trem at 12:18 PM | Comments (0)

Entry is tagged: Events & News @KSL

November 02, 2016

Jewish Views @ CWRU

Join us for an evening with CWRU alumni student activists and The Jewish View at CWRU exhibit opening reception on Monday, November 7th, 2016 at 6 pm in Kelvin Smith Library Special Collections. The exhibit will be on view through March 2017. The exhibit features images, clippings, yearbooks, and ephemera related to the CWRU Jewish perspective during the socio-political changes of 1967-1973.The Jewish View at CWRU is a multi-year, collaborative project that aims to uncover the historical role of Jewish students, faculty, and administrators at CWRU from its founding to the present, supported by the Program in Judaic Studies and the Freedman Center for Digital Scholarship.


Posted on KSL News Blog by Mahmoud Audu at 09:41 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events & News @KSL

November 14, 2016

Remembering 1997-1998: Week 11

The November 14, 1997 issue of The Observer included a special focus section on money management. Articles included:

• CWRU students face 3rd highest debt in nation
• Merit based scholarship criteria revised
• Job opportuinities permeate the campus
• University offers topics for financial planning
• Tuition increases expected through 2000
• Student responses to the question, “How do you save money?”
“I don’t do laundry.”
“I stay out of the bars.”
“I buy necessities, not luxuries – or only a few luxuries.”
“I eat before I go to the grocery store.”
“I’m going to grad school – it’s hard to save money if one doesn’t have a job.”

Other headlines included:
• University continues search for library director
• Class officers are busy planning events for CWRU
• Phi Kaps are first to finish service hours this year
• Caroline Whitbeck joins CWRU as ethics chair

And here's the entire issue: The Observer, 11/14/1997

This is one in a series of weekly blog postings describing what was happening at CWRU, as covered by The Observer, during the year many of the Class of 2020 were born.

Posted on Recollections from the Archives by Jill Tatem at 02:12 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events and Activities

September 25, 2015

Kelvin Smith Library is a SHARES Member

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**DISCLAIMER: As of November 2016, Kelvin Smith Library has withdrawn its membership from the SHARES partnership, and as such no longer enjoys the privileges described below. I have decided to keep this posting up in its most recent draft below with no further updates, as a matter of "historical interest" (and also because I put so much time and effort into it that I don't have the heart to delete it). See also my November 8, 2016 entry.(CM)

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So what does this mean? Well, the SHARES Research Libraries Group is a worldwide consortium consisting of over 100 participating institutions. Membership in this group affords us preferential treatment for interlibrary loan services among our peer libraries. Researchers from our university also enjoy comparable on-site collection and service access (short of full borrowing privileges), while visiting any of these locations. This is particularly valuable to traveling scholars in facilitating their research endeavors while away from our campus.

For your convenience, below is a list of those institutions closest geographically to our university, primarily within Ohio and its surrounding states (and province). Note there are currently no SHARES members in Indiana, Kentucky, West Virginia or Wisconsin.

OHIO:

Cleveland Museum of Art, Ingalls Library
Hebrew Union College, Klau Library
Ohio State University, Health Sciences Library
Ohio State University Libraries

MICHIGAN:

University of Michigan
University of Michigan, Law Library

PENNSYLVANIA:

Bryn Mawr College, Canaday Library
Carnegie Mellon University, Hunt Library
Haverford College Library
Pennsylvania State University Libraries
Swarthmore College, McCabe Library
Temple University, Paley Library
University of Pennsylvania, Biddle Law Library
University of Pennsylvania, Van Pelt Library

WESTERN & CENTRAL NEW YORK:

Binghamton University, Bartle Library
Cornell University Library
Syracuse University Libraries

NORTHERN ILLINOIS:

Art Institute of Chicago, Ryerson & Burnham Libraries
Northwestern University
University of Chicago Library

SOUTHERN ONTARIO (CANADA):

University of Toronto, Engineering & Computer Science Library
University of Toronto, Gerstein Science Information Centre
University of Toronto, Mississauga Library
University of Toronto, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education
University of Toronto, Robarts Library
University of Toronto, Scarborough Library

Others of Major Importance:

Library of Congress
New York Public Library

During the course of our membership in the SHARES program, we have been provided easier access to the collections of a number of specialized and international libraries. This has allowed us to obtain use of materials we previously were not permitted to borrow or have reproduced. We hope our users will also choose to take advantage of the special benefits available with on-site use at other member institution locations.

If you have any questions or concerns regarding ILL services and the SHARES library consortium, please contact us, by phone at (216) 368-3463 or (216) 368-3517, or by e-mail at smithill@case.edu.

Posted on Carl's ILLiad Blog by Carl Mariani at 11:15 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Policies | Recommendations | Services