This is an aggregation of all of the recent blog posts of the Case Blog system. The entries are in reverse chronological order according to each entry's last modified date. Persons with questions regarding Planet Case or the Blog system can check the FAQ or email us at blog-admin@case.edu.

Atom 1.0 feed for Planet Case Subscribe to Planet Case

May 27, 2015

Law professor’s new book offers wide-ranging tips on aging and caring for elderly loved ones

Sharona Hoffman turns her own life lessons into a resource for others




News Release: Wednesday, May 27, 2015



The challenges can be immense when a busy middle-aged person must adapt to managing the care of an elderly family member or close friend, especially if one or more chronic illnesses are involved.

A new book by Case Western Reserve University School of Law Professor Sharona Hoffman details how people can make sure elderly parents or other relatives get the care they need to maintain fulfilling lifestyles and social ties. It’s also a book about how baby boomers can prepare for their own aging.

Aging with a Plan: How a Little Thought Today Can Vastly Improve Your Tomorrow (Praeger Publishers, 2015) is a new release as of May. Hoffman is the law school’s Edgar A. Hahn Professor of Law, a professor of bioethics and co-director of the Law-Medicine Center at Case Western Reserve.

“My book identifies effective strategies that can minimize the potential pitfalls of aging,” Hoffman said. “It is a concise and comprehensive resource for a middle-aged audience planning for their later years and at times immersed in caring for elderly relatives, an often overwhelming task for which little in life has prepared us.”

Unlike many other books about aging that focus on a single topic, such as health, finances or law, Aging with a Plan explores a range of issues, providing practical and absorbing discussions of each. The book offers “one-stop shopping for those who seek to plan for their own old age or to anticipate the needs of aging relatives," Hoffman said.

Chapters address topics such as retirement savings and expenses, residential settings, legal planning, the elderly and driving, coordinated medical care, long-term care and end-of-life decisions.

Hoffman was motivated to write the book because of her own experiences and worries. In an 18-month period beginning in May 2013, Hoffman lost both parents and her mother-in-law, and her husband was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. She came to learn, however, that she was not alone in grappling with such travails, as illustrated in a story that opens the book.

She recalls how a lunchtime conversation with a colleague drifted to the subject of eldercare:

“My husband and I had been immersed in caring for elderly relatives who were in their mid-eighties and beyond,” she writes. “My friend revealed that she too was coordinating care for her mother, who was in her nineties, had advanced dementia, and lived in another state.”

Hoffman expressed in that conversation that their parents “were lucky,” because at least they had adult children to help them, and that she has begun to worry about eventually reaching old age, because she and her husband have no children to help them.

“Then, my friend surprised me and stated that she enjoys a very close relationship with her only son, but what she fears most about aging is that her son will come to dread visiting her and will consider contact with her to be an unwelcome obligation. Having a devoted child, therefore, was hardly a comfort when she contemplated her later years,” Hoffman writes.

The issues in her book are especially relevant today. It is expected that by 2030, 20 percent of Americans will be 65 and older. Moreover, about half of the nation’s seniors have been diagnosed with at least two chronic conditions.

Hoffman’s book has been endorsed by several prominent individuals. They write, in part, as follows:

"Driven by personal experience and a respected career in bioethics and law, Sharona Hoffman provides us a vibrant, very useable chapter by chapter guide, inclusive of actionable checklists to prepare for the next phases our lives as we experience the 40s to 80s.”—Jennie Chin Hansen, CEO, American Geriatrics Society; former president of AARP

"The book is particularly useful for Baby Boomers dealing with their own elderly parents. The author expertly uses case studies involving her own family to teach lessons relevant to any family.”—David English, professor of law, University of Missouri; Chair, ABA Commission on Law and Aging

"Learning about these choices with this excellent reference beforehand will definitely make stressful events more manageable."—Michael F. Roizen, M.D., author of This is Your Do-Over

Editors note: Sharona’s Hoffman’s book launch is planned at Coventry Village Library, 1925 Coventry Rd., Cleveland Heights, Ohio, at 2 p.m. on Sunday, June 14.


Posted on Think by Marvin Kropko at 07:26 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Official Release

May 22, 2015

Social sciences researchers at Case Western Reserve University integrate active learning and technology in “flipped” classroom approach




News Release: May 22, 2015




As part of a larger initiative to promote active learning at Case Western Reserve University, researchers from the social work school participated in a yearlong project to integrate active instruction and academic technologies into their courses.

The use of interactive technology and technology-based peer-to-peer active learning was considered a natural fit to teach clinical practice skills in social work—techniques designed to recognize students’ diverse learning styles and promote the hands-on application of skills in classroom and field settings.

Researchers, led by Megan R. Holmes, an assistant professor at the Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences, implemented the following innovations:

• A foundation methods practice course was “flipped”—students viewed online lectures and instructional videos at their own pace before meeting for class, allowing classroom time to be reserved for collaborative work and case-study exercises to engage students and deepen their understanding.

• Google technology was used in both foundation and advanced masters courses to: help bridge the gap between field and classroom work through case study discussions with community practitioners through video conferencing; create an online and in-class learning community; and promote student collaboration.

• The integration of newly designed interactive classroom learning spaces and collaborative technology to promote a shift toward active learning.

The new approach is described in the Clinical Social Work Journal article “Moving from the Flipcharts to the Flipped Classroom: Using Technology Driven Teaching Methods to Promote Active Learning in Foundation and Advanced Masters Social Work Courses.”

In summer 2013, Case Western Reserve built two active learning spaces designed to promote collaboration, small group exercises and problem-solving. In contrast to typical classrooms with technology mainly for the instructor’s use, these rooms provide several large computer screens for students to use, software to collaborate in small groups and share their work with the class, movable furniture and multiple writing surfaces, which promotes active learning and collaboration.

An example of an active learning in-class project is writing up the psychosocial characteristics of a case study client and assessing the individual’s needs that can guide the social worker.

Teams of students work on assessments using a shared Google document, with each team contributing a portion of the material. And in real time, teams can read what other groups have contributed and learn from it, Holmes said. And when class is over, each has a template to use as a guide in new client assessments.

“Without spending time lecturing, students are freed to experience and practice skills they need as social workers,” Holmes said, “and they collaborate with others and learn from the process.”

Results

Student feedback through course assessments and evaluations indicated that that some enjoyed the variation of group activities and that such activities produced a sense of classroom community. Based on feedback from 46 students in two social sciences courses:

• Students liked the flexibility of moveable, comfortable seating.

• They liked the ability to collaborate using the large screen displays.

• Students also noted the importance of multiple electrical outlets for them to charge their personal devices, often a challenge in more traditionally designed classroom space.

• However, some students were initially somewhat overwhelmed by the amount of new technologies used in the courses. Two comments included that both unfamiliarity with Google drive or being a non-traditional student required a little more “hand holding to understand the technology” and “struggles to access the electronic/computer information.”

• The students felt that once they understood how to use them, they were helpful, but the beginning of the course did create some anxiety.

• The feedback provided by these students, along with the data supporting the benefit of using these applications, have led the program to incorporate technology training in the student orientation.

Elizabeth M. Tracy, Grace Longwell Coyle Professor in Social Work and associate dean for research and training at the Mandel School, combines traditional lectures enhanced with technologies to draw students into the learning experience for the required “Theory and Practice Approaches in Direct Practice Social Work” course.

“Since most students bring their laptops to class, it just makes sense to actively use this technology during class time in ways beyond taking notes,” said Tracy, who also contributed to the article.

Laurie Longs Painter, field faculty in social work, used technology to connect students with field instructors in the community so they could get expert advice on case study assessments and interventions.

Holmes, Tracy and Painter are among 24 faculty members in the past two years who received an Active Learning Fellowship. Faculty make a year long commitment to attend workshops and design a course using active learning techniques and technologies. The ITS active learning workshops help faculty understand active learning and how to integrate the method into teaching, said Tina Oestreich, an ITS faculty support and academic technology leader at Case Western Reserve.

“The Active Learning Fellowship is part of an effort to transform the culture of teaching and learning at CWRU, with new learning spaces being part of the effort,” Oestreich said. “The goal is to help faculty to think more deeply about their own teaching practices, provide recognition for faculty's participation in the fellowship, communicate their efforts to their departments, the university and beyond and provide an additional avenue for academic research.”

Holmes, Tracy, Painter, Oestreich and doctoral candidate Hyunyong Park, from the Mandel School, contributed to the research.


Posted on Think by Susan Griffith at 03:45 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Official Release

May 22, 2015

New issue of KSL Connects now available online

Want to know the latest news about Kelvin Smith Library services, spaces and resources? The new issue of KSL Connects magazine shares the library's strategic vision for advancing research, teaching and learning at Case Western Reserve University.

In this issue, readers will discover what "a day in the life" of a research services librarian entails, explore exhibits and events, envision redesigned library spaces, celebrate faculty authors and much more.

Click here to view the online edition today.


Continue reading "New issue of KSL Connects now available online"

Posted on KSL News Blog by Hannah Levy at 02:41 PM | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Events & News @KSL

May 28, 2013

Social Justice, Faith, and Hurricane Sandy

play button.gif

Destruction can sometimes bring people together. In the wake of the destruction of Hurricane Sandy, Reverend Eileen Vizcaino traveled with a van full of Case Western Reserve University students to the hardest hit parts of New Jersey in order to help rebuild. Reverend Vizcaino is the Director of Student-Community Ministries and Chaplain to College Students for the Church of the Covenant and University, and this week on Regionally Speaking, she shares the details of this experience along with her own personal inspirations and faith.

Eileen



(from left to right)
Reverend Eileen Vizcaino, Director of Student-Community Ministries, Chaplain to College Students for the Church of the Covenant and University and Community Ministries.
Gladys Haddad, host of Regionally Speaking

Posted on Regionally Speaking by Elliot Schwartz at 05:39 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged:

July 29, 2013

Educating for Struggle

play button.gif

The Social Justice Institute at Case Western Reserve University is dedicated to finding sustainable and just solutions to societal problems. But how exactly does a university go about addressing systemic inequality? This week on Regionally Speaking, Janice Eatman-Williams, Assistant Director of the Center for Civic Engagement and Learning, provides an overview of the Social Justice Institute’s history and goals, as well as its involvement within the Cleveland community.

IMG_0388.JPG


(from left to right)
Gladys Haddad, host of Regionally Speaking
Janice Eatman-Williams, Assistant Director of the Center for Civic Engagement and Learning at Case Western Reserve University

Posted on Regionally Speaking by Alexander Aloi at 04:40 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged:

November 24, 2013

Improving Public Health and Nursing Student Experience through Community Connections

play button.gif


IMG_2776[1].JPG
(from left to right)
Dr. Lyn Lotas, Associate Dean of the Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program at Case Western Reserve University.
Gladys Haddad, host of Regionally Speaking


On this week's program, Lyn Lotus explains how the School of Nursing's approach towards community-based health has revitalized students' learning experience while establishing connections that serve the local community. She also describes the Prentiss Grant for Youth Obesity, a 5-year study now in its 4th year, and her experience in Lebanon on a Fulbright Scholarship.

Posted on Regionally Speaking by Thenessa Savitsky at 09:50 PM | Comments (7) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged:

November 18, 2013

Growing Campus Connections: Improving First-Year Experience, Uniting Facultly, Parent and Family Outreach

play button.gif


IMG_2907[1].JPG
(from left to right)
Edwin Mayes, member of Enrollment Management Leadership Team and Director of First Year Experience and Family Programs
Gladys Haddad, host of Regionally Speaking


With a growing undergraduate population and the rapid changes occurring in University Circle, addressing the needs of first-year students and keeping the campus community connected is a great concern. Today we speak with Edwin Mayes, the Director of First-Year Experience and Family Programs, who explains how he is improving student retention rates through collaboration, acknowledging progress while reconciling gaps between faculty, and engaging more deeply with parents.

Posted on Regionally Speaking by Thenessa Savitsky at 03:00 PM | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged:

December 02, 2013

The Student-Run Free Clinic: Serving the Cleveland Community

play button.gif


IMG_2776[1].JPG
(from left to right)
Maggie Lowe
Gladys Haddad, host of Regionally Speaking
Jillian Baugh


Today we are grateful to have input from two students involved with the Student-Run Free Clinic: Maggie Lowe, a student in the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, and Jillian Baugh, a second-year student with an Adult Mental Health concentration at the Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences. They discuss the clinic's historical background, specific services, founding goals, and upcoming fundraising events!
How can the audience help out?
- Check out www.srfc.case.edu
- Participate in Case Western's Day of Giving on December 3rd
- Do your Christmas shopping at 10,000 Villages in Cleveland Heights on December 18th to support the Free Clinic!

Posted on Regionally Speaking by Thenessa Savitsky at 12:42 AM | Comments (3) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: CWRU students

December 23, 2013

The Formation of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People at Case Western Reserve University

play button.gif


IMG_2776[1].JPG
(from left to right)
Jasmine Kirkland, NAACP Vice President
Gladys Haddad, host of Regionally Speaking
Onyi Ibeziako, NAACP President


On today' s program, we are joined by the two inspiring students who founded the Case Western Reserve University Chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). President Onyi Ibeziako and Vice President Jasmine Kirkland share with us how they mobilized the formation of this group, as well as their individual experiences in recruiting support from both within and beyond CWRU.

Posted on Regionally Speaking by Thenessa Savitsky at 01:17 PM | Comments (7) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged:

February 10, 2014

The Power of Literacy

play button.gif

On this episode of Regionally Speaking, aired on February 3, 2014, Gladys Haddad speaks with Deborah McHamm, the President and CEO of A Cultural Exchange. The non-profit organization began in Cleveland, OH to promote literacy as an empowering tool and to provide books for those who do not have the means of getting them. McHamm talks extensively of her projects, including Ready Baby Read and Busy Bookmobile, and how to make books the center of a new community of young people.

fey final.JPG



(left) Gladys Haddad, host of Regionally Speaking
(right) Deborah McHamm, President and CEO of A Cultural Exchange

Posted on Regionally Speaking by Kathryn Witkowski at 01:45 AM | Comments (8) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: education

March 26, 2014

Reverend Eileen Vizcaino: Director of Student Community Ministries at the Church of the Covenant Presbyterian Church in Cleveland

play button.gif

Reverend Eileen Vizcaino, Director of Student Community Ministries at the Church of the Covenant Presbyterian Church in Cleveland, shares her experiences working with the church and student community at Case Western Reserve University. Reverend Vizcaino also discusses this year's alternative spring break opportunity helping to rebuild houses in New Jersey.

revelaine.jpg



(left) Gladys Haddad, host of Regionally Speaking
(right) Reverend Eileen Vizcaino, Director of Student Community Ministries at the Church of the Covenant Presbyterian Church in Cleveland

Posted on Regionally Speaking by Drew Blazewicz at 06:15 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged:

February 28, 2014

Connecting Lawmakers with the Community

play button.gif

Shakyra Diaz, Case Western Reserve University alumnus, shares her experiences working with the American Civil Liberties Union of Ohio and some of the types of cases she works on. Diaz also discusses what she must do in order to properly complete her job, such as embedding herself in her community, listening to those who are not used to speaking up and bridging the gap between the community and those who create laws.

fey final.JPG



(right) Gladys Haddad, host of Regionally Speaking
(left) Shakyra Diaz, policy director at the American Civil Liberties Union of Ohio

Posted on Regionally Speaking by Kathryn Witkowski at 05:00 PM | Comments (5) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged:

March 31, 2014

Tutoring Outreach Programs

play button.gif

Arthur Evenchik, assistant to the dean for special projects in the College of Arts and Sciences at Case Western Reserve University, and Beth Hodges, undergraduate student at Case Western Reserve University discuss their experiences and involvement with the tutoring programs at Case Western Reserve University.

photo.JPG



(left) Beth Hodges, student and tutor at Case Western Reserve University
(middle) Gladys Haddad, host of Regionally Speaking
(right) Arthur Evenchik, assistant to the dean for special projects at the College of Arts and Sciences at Case Western Reserve University

Posted on Regionally Speaking by Drew Blazewicz at 12:00 PM | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged:

April 07, 2014

Journalism and Social Change in Cleveland in the 60s and 70s

play button.gif

Cleveland journalist Dick Peery discusses his experiences working in the city of Cleveland during the late 60s and 70s and the changing race relations of the time.

photo (1).JPG



(left) Dick Peery, Cleveland journalist
(right) Gladys Haddad, host of Regionally Speaking

Posted on Regionally Speaking by Drew Blazewicz at 02:45 PM | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged:

April 28, 2014

Sharing the Wisdom of WISER

play button.gif

Heather Clayton Terry, Associate Director for Women, discusses the history and her involvement in the Women in Science and Engineering Roundtable, WISER. With her is Ashley Han, student at Case Western Reserve University and President and WISER Leadership Coordinator, discusses what encouraged her to become affiliated with the group, and the many programs run through WISER to encourage women to stay interested in studying science and engineering.

photo (1).JPG



(left) Heather Clayton Terry, Associate Director for Women in WISER
(center) Gladys Haddad, host of Regionally Speaking
(right) Ashley Han, President and WISER Leadership Coordinator

Posted on Regionally Speaking by Drew Blazewicz at 09:25 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged:

May 07, 2014

Shelley White on the Social Justice Institute at Case Western Reserve University

play button.gif

Shelley White, Administrator for the Social Justice Institute at Case Western Reserve University discusses her involvement with the Social Justice Institute and shares how she became involved.

shelleyWhite.jpg



(left) Shelley White, Administrator for the Social Justice Institute at Case Western Reserve University
(right) Gladys Haddad, host of Regionally speaking

Posted on Regionally Speaking by Drew Blazewicz at 11:30 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged:

May 11, 2014

The Social Justice Institute on Curriculum Development, Community Bridge Building and Educating Agents for Social Change

play button.gif

IMG_2686[1].JPG

(from left to right)
Gladys Haddad, host of Regionally Speaking
Rhonda Y. Williams, Director of Case Western Reserve University's Social Justice Institute


This fall, the Social Justice Institute reaches its third year of establishment at Case Western Reserve University. In this series, the program’s Founder and Executive Director Dr. Rhonda Y. Williams describes the Institute’s early history, accomplishments, and current objectives, which include the addition of a Social Justice curriculum at Case Western and the utilization of feedback from Cleveland residents about their city’s development. Dr. Williams also recounts her own educational and professional background which led her to CWRU and informs us about the upcoming Social Justice Institute Think Tank symposium on November 15-16!

Posted on Regionally Speaking by Thenessa Savitsky at 05:50 PM | Comments (13) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged:

October 23, 2014

Investigating Marginalized Populations

play button.gif

floresandblack.jpg

(from left to right)
John Flores, Climo Junior Professor of the College of Arts and Sciences at Case Western Reserve University
Gladys Haddad, host of Regionally Speaking
Tim Black, Associate Professor of Sociology and a Faculty Associate of the Social Justice Institute

Dr. Gladys Haddad is joined by Tim Black and John Flores. Tim Black, Associate Professor of Sociology and a Faculty Associate of the Social Justice Institute, discusses his work in researching and understanding marginalized minorities in society and talks about his book, "When A Heart Turns Rock Solid". John Flores, Climo Junior Professor of the College of Arts and Sciences at Case Western Reserve University, discusses his work in the area of Mexican American history and the manuscript of his upcoming book.


Social Justice Institute Think Tank symposium on November 15-16!

Posted on Regionally Speaking by Drew Blazewicz at 03:30 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged:

November 06, 2014

Children Being Pushed Out Of Schools

play button.gif

IMG_2705.JPG

(from left to right)
Gabriella Celeste, JD is Director of Child Policy for the Schubert Center for Child Studies at Case Western Reserve University
Gladys Haddad, host of Regionally Speaking
Shakyra Diaz is Policy Director of ACLU of Ohio

In this installment of Regionally Speaking Gabrielle Celeste, Director of Child Policy for the Schubert Center for Child Studies at Case Western Reserve University, and Shakyra Diaz, Policy Director of ACLU of Ohio, bring to light a worrying epidemic of children being pushed out of schools. Celeste and Diaz speak to the causes of growing numbers of expulsions and suspensions and address the legislation that may help students and schools get back on track.


Social Justice Institute Think Tank symposium on November 15-16!

Posted on Regionally Speaking by Drew Blazewicz at 08:28 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged:

November 22, 2014

Feminism and Social Justice

play button.gif

IMG_2725.JPG

(from left to right)
Susan Hinze, Associate Professor of Sociology and Women's Gender Studies
Gladys Haddad, Host of Regionally Speaking

Susan Hinze discusses feminism and gender inequality. She explains how she became a feminist and relates the importance of gender inequality education. She also discusses her work in helping to create the new Social Justice Minor at Case Western Reserve University.

Posted on Regionally Speaking by Drew Blazewicz at 01:40 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged:

January 21, 2015

Reproductive Justice

play button.gif

jessieHill.JPG

(from left to right)
Jessie Hill, Associate Dean for Faculty Development and Research at Case Western Reserve University
Gladys Haddad, Host of Regionally Speaking

Jessie Hill discusses the fight for reproductive rights and how she became involved in it. Jessie Hill is Associate Dean for Faculty Development and Research at Case Western Reserve University, as well as a Professor of Law and Laura B. Chisolm Distinguished Research Scholar.

Posted on Regionally Speaking by Sarah Bailey at 04:15 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged:

January 23, 2015

Kenneth Clement Boys' Academy

play button.gif

Bell.jpg

(from left to right)
Gladys Haddad, Host of Regionally Speaking
Demeris Bell, Security guard at Kenneth Clement

Demeris Bell, School Security Guard for the Cleveland Metropolitan School District at the Kenneth W. Clement Boys’ Leadership Academy, talks about his educational background as encouraged by his parents. He is now actively involved in the parenting of his sons and his career in advancing opportunities for those enrolled at the Kenneth W. Clement Boys Leadership Academy.

Posted on Regionally Speaking by Sarah Bailey at 06:00 PM | Comments (9) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged:

May 21, 2015

Case Western Reserve University dental researchers discover some disease-fighting cells may actually convert to prolong inflammation


News Release: May 21, 2015



Researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine have unraveled one of the mysteries of how a small group of immune cells work: That some inflammation-fighting immune cells may actually convert into cells that trigger disease.

Their findings, recently reported in the journal Pathogens, could lead to advances in fighting diseases, said the project's lead researcher Pushpa Pandiyan, an assistant professor at the dental school. 

The cells at work

A type of white blood cell, called T-cells, is one of the body’s critical disease fighters. Regulatory immune cells, called “Tregs,” direct T-cells and control unwanted immune reactions that cause inflammation. They are known to produce only anti-inflammatory proteins to keep inflammation caused by disease in check.

But using mouse models, the researchers studied how the body fights off a common oral fungus that causes thrush. They found that these harmful invaders activate a mechanism in Tregs that could transform the inflammation-fighting cells into cells that allow the disease to flourish. 

The study

When the immune system functions normally, disease-fighting T-cells produce inflammatory secretions—proteins that can cause symptoms, such as soreness or swelling at the infected site. This process is evident, for example, when a cut or glands swell from the infection’s inflammatory reaction.  

Once the invader is gone, the disease-fighting cells—with help from Treg cells—normally shut down those proteins to control long-term inflammation.

But the researchers found that, during oral thrush, yeast sugars on the surface of the disease-causing fungus act as a binding agent and can activate a small population of Treg cells to make inflammatory proteins themselves. (The researchers are calling this novel subset of malfunctioning cells Treg-17 cells).

“An excess of these malfunctioning cells can lead to the inflammatory disease process instead of stopping it,” she said. 

Other binding agents normally found in the body may create these cells and contribute to continued inflammation, the researchers concluded. 

Other researchers have reported the presence of these cells in many human inflammation conditions, such as psoriasis, periodontitis and arthritis. Until now, however, the mechanisms of how these cells developed were not completely understood, Pandiyan said. 


The implications

The findings will help researchers understand the origin of cells they suspect may keep the disease active or, at a minimum, don’t battle inflammation. Pandiyan believes the knowledge could lead to new ways to fight diseases, such as: 

- Using the converting Tregs (Treg-17) to identify chronic inflammation, including oral inflammation.

- Using the persistence of Treg-17 cells to indicate an excessive amount of the inflammatory proteins.

- Using the presence of the binding agent that triggers the cell's conversion as a point to use medicines to block its connection to Tregs.

Future studies will investigate whether these cells are actually perpetrating inflammation.

The study, “TLR-2 Signaling Promotes IL-17A Production in CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Regulatory Cells during Oropharyngeal Candidiasis,” was recently reported in Pathogens. 

CWRU Department of Biological Science researchers Natarajan Bhaskaran, Samuel Cohen, Aaron Weinberg and Yifan Zhang contributed to the study.




Posted on Think by Susan Griffith at 12:28 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Official Release

April 20, 2015

Essential ILLiad vs. OhioLINK

Here is a brief rundown of the basic differences between ILLiad and OhioLINK, as they complement the array of Kelvin Smith Library's service offerings...

* ILLiad provides both loans (returnables) and copies (non-returnables).
* OhioLINK supplies loans only, although occasional reproductions of entire non-circulating items have been provided on a case-by-case basis at lenders' discretion.

* ILLiad loan periods and renewal policies vary with individual lending institutions.
* OhioLINK loan periods and renewal policies are uniform within the consortium, with some variation based on material type and user status.

* ILLiad requires individual account set-up by the user. It functions independently of university single sign-on, but relies upon valid authentication with an active circulation system library account.
* OhioLINK requires logging into service through the library online catalog (as with single sign-on), in tandem with an active circulation system library account.

* ILLiad is available at all four of the university's library systems (KSL, Law, MSASS, CHSL), and location choice for registration is based on your affiliation (i.e., college or department) within the university.
* OhioLINK is automatically part of your overall library privileges as a member of the university community.

* ILLiad logon requires good standing in your library circulation account (e.g., fines not in excess of $15), but also no current ILL loans exceeding two weeks past their due dates.
* OhioLINK requires good standing in your library circulation account (e.g., fines not in excess of $15), as with any on-campus library borrowing.

* ILLiad current transactions must be viewed by logging into an ILLiad session.
* OhioLINK current loan transactions are viewed by logging into "My Account" in the in the library's online catalog, together with any local checkouts.

* ILLiad loans are to be picked up at and returned directly to Kelvin Smith Library. This applies likewise for any other supporting campus service point library (Law, MSASS, CHSL) through a which loan request was processed.
* OhioLINK loans may be picked up at any available campus library service point (selected at the time the request is submitted), and may be returned to any of the same locations regardless of original pickup site.

* ILLiad loans are indirect, with Kelvin Smith Library (or another supporting campus service point library) acting as an intermediary borrower. Likewise, renewals are processed and mediated through your library's ILL staff, necessitating some response delay time.
* OhioLINK loans are directly checked out to the borrowing patron, on his or her internal library circulation account. Renewals are requested directly by the patron, with responses usually occurring within real time.

* ILLiad provides patrons with copies via electronic delivery, including journal and newspaper articles, book chapters, and conference proceeding papers.
* OhioLINK does not provide copies, and access to electronic journals and books subscribed to by other consortium member libraries are generally not available to CWRU users.

* ILLiad draws most of its resources from libraries within the United States (including Ohio, of course), but may also obtain materials from Canada, Europe, Asia, Australia and other potential lender locations throughout the world.
* OhioLINK draws all of its loans from member libraries within the state of Ohio, as well as from the Center for Research Libraries (in Chicago, Illinois).

And finally...

* ILLiad is NOT the "International Version of OhioLINK", regardless of what the tour guides say! ILLiad and OhioLINK function differently from one another, with virtually no duplication, to supplement the internal collections and resources of Kelvin Smith Library.

-- Links to helpful resources referenced above...

ILLiad Main Logon (ILL via ILLiad, KSL only)
OhioLINK Catalog (OhioLINK)
Library Catalog (OhioLINK & local circulation)
My Library Account (OhioLINK & local circulation)

-- Useful contact information...

smithcirc@case.edu (OhioLINK & local circulation)
smithill@case.edu (ILL via ILLiad, KSL only)

For more detailed information on the differences between these loan transactions, please also see my previous entry, titled "OhioLINK Loans vs. ILLiad Loans at KSL", from October 23, 2014.

Posted on Carl's ILLiad Blog by Carl Mariani at 10:55 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Features | Policies | Services

May 25, 2011

Paperwork with Loaned ILL Books

Whenever you check out and use a book (or any other formats of loaned materials) borrowed through ILLiad, you will frequently encounter various forms of paperwork included, either paper-clipped inside one of the covers, banded around the front cover, inserted into a card pocket (if one is present), or tucked inside the microfilm box or microfiche envelope. These are usually the corresponding transaction workform printouts, but also may include other policy-related documents provided by lender library, return mailing labels, or other important associated materials. You may sometimes also notice that lender libraries even include notations such as 'PLEASE RETURN THIS FORM WITH LOANED ITEMS!' or 'PLEASE RETURN PAPERWORK WITH BOOK' printed on their forms, and so this expectation should already be straightforward and self-evident to our library customers (as well as to any staff handling these materials).

We therefore politely request that you do not ever remove or discard any of these items, as they are very often essential to proper completion of the loan transaction processing (for both our own ILL staff and that of the lending institution). Misplacement of these materials can result in delays in the correct updating of transaction records due to the additional searching time that will almost certainly be involved, or worse yet, in mis-routing of the loaned item requiring further search and tracking efforts by library and courier staff members (ultimately with the potential for lost status as well as replacement costs billed).

Please be aware that our ILL Department cannot and does not maintain a cumbersome, inefficient file for the temporary retention of the received paperwork associated with individual loans. Thus the most practical solution has always been to have any such documentation kept attached to, or inserted inside, the corresponding items at all times while in our department's possession or that of our patrons. As a user of our services, it is part of your agreement in enjoying ILL borrowing privileges to respect this policy to the best of your ability, keeping in mind that these loaned items are NOT the property of the Kelvin Smith Library and have been generously provided to us by considerate partner institutions graciously willing to share their materials.

An additional related concern it the issue of 'Library Use Only' slips that occasionally apply to the loan of certain types of loaned materials. For one reason or another (usually because of fragile condition or irreplaceability), the lender library will impose this restriction. This slip, when applicable, is generated by the ILL staff of Kelvin Smith Library in consequence, and included with the loaned item or items. The procedure involved here (covered at length previously in my March 25, 2009 entry, 'Library-Use-Only' Materials Borrowed through ILLiad) is, in short, as follows...

When you check out an ILL item bearing this restriction, you first sign and date the regular checkout slip. You then will also date the 'Library Use Only' slip on the 'Out' line for your first use, leave the slip with circulation staff at the desk, and then take the material to a suitable location (e.g., Freedman Center, photocopy machine) for careful and appropriate use within the confines of the KSL building. When you have completed a usage period, you will return the item to the main desk, and date the 'In' line of the slip. If you are completely finished using it, also check off the 'RETURNED' box at that time. (You have the option of returning for several future use periods if you choose--the item will be held for you on the Main Service Desk hold shelf with the slip until your next use, but will still remain checked out to you in your ILLiad account records until you indicate it is no longer needed after your final use.)

By adhering to these simple, undemanding guidelines, you ultimately can affect the level of service we provide, as treating loaned ILL materials with consideration impinges directly and indirectly upon our good relations with those partner institutions that provide us with these resources (which in turn contribute to the quality of your own research). We greatly appreciate your co-operation and courteous compliance in this minor but not insignificant respect.

Posted on Carl's ILLiad Blog by Carl Mariani at 09:09 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Policies | Recommendations

December 18, 2008

ILLiad Loans vs. OhioLINK Loans & Local Checkouts

Just another reminder that your loans obtained through ILLiad are managed separately from those items you have borrowed directly from the Kelvin Smith Library, from other CASE campus library locations, and from OhioLINK collections.

In order to view your current ILLiad loan transactions, you must log into your account at ILLiad. A list of your outstanding requests will appear on your Main Page, which will include those for any loans (and articles) still in process by ILL Staff, as well as any loans still awaiting pick-up. You may refresh this page by clicking on 'Your Name's ILLiad Page' at the top of the menu at the left, or you may check outstanding requests by clicking on 'Outstanding Requests' under the 'View' section. If you require further details regarding the current status of any outstanding requests still 'In Process', you will need to contact ILL Staff at 216-368-3517 or 216-368-3463 (M-F, 9AM-4:30PM), or at smithill@case.edu. For currently checked out loans, click on 'Checked Out Items' under the 'View' section also -- this is where you may request renewals, where eligible (see my previous entry on 'Requesting Renewals in ILLiad', or read about Renewals in our 'Customer Help' page).

To view any current loans from KSL collections, from any other CASE campus or CASE-affiliated libraries, or through OhioLINK, see the CASE Library Catalog and select 'My Library Account'. Here you will be able to renew these items, if they are eligible. For information regarding loans from the Cleveland Public Library, read further at CPL@Case-KSL.

Please note that any fines or replacement fees for KSL or OhioLINK books must be negotiated through our Circulation Department, which you may contact at 216-368-3506 or at smithcontact@case.edu. We recommend that you contact other CASE library locations (Cleveland Health Sciences, MSASS, LAW, etc.) directly regarding fines on items from their collections.

We do not pass on overdue fines to patrons for books borrowed through ILLiad, as a matter of policy, but we do ask that you try to return these items as soon as possible. In the unfortunate instance of the loss of materials loaned through ILLiad, notify ILL Staff immediately, at 216-368-3517 or 216-368-3463, or at smithill@case.edu -- ILL staff will then need to contact the lending institution(s) on policies regarding replacement fees, and you will most likely be held accountable for compensation of any such losses. Your borrowing privileges may also become curtailed as a result, until any billings have been reconciled.

Sorry to end on such a depressing note... Hope this will clear up any confusion about the differences among the various sources of loans which you may obtain through our library services.

Posted on Carl's ILLiad Blog by Carl Mariani at 08:37 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Policies | Recommendations | Services

December 03, 2008

Blocked ILLiad Accounts

The end of the Fall 2008 Semester is nearing, and it's probably a time when many books borrowed though interlibrary loan are about to become overdue. If you have loans currently checked out through your ILLiad account, you may already have begun receiving e-mail notifications reminding you that they are soon to be returned, or are already overdue. You would have already been afforded the opportunity to request a renewal by now (under the right circumstances -- see my previous entry on 'Requesting Renewals in ILLiad'), but it's possible you've let this slip by due to a busy schedule.

The worst-case scenario might be receiving a message with the subject heading 'Overdue ILL Item - Blocked on ILLiad'. At this point, you are still able to log into your ILLiad account, but when you attempt to submit a new interlibrary loan request, you will receive the following message at the top of your page: 'You have been blocked and may not submit new requests...' This indicates that your KSL ILLiad account has lapsed to a 'blocked' status and your ILL privileges are now limited, as a result of having one or more current loan transactions at least 14 days overdue. To find out more details about what this implies, check the excerpt in our 'Customer Help' page regarding your Blocked ILLiad Account.

In order to remedy this situation, we would ask that you return any overdue ILLiad loans this far in arrears (or longer) directly to the Kelvin Smith Library Main Service Desk -- as soon as possible. (Returning items in the outdoor book drop or to other Case campus library locations will only slow the process.) Circulation staff can set your loan transaction(s) to a 'transit' status promptly, and this will prevent you from receiving further e-mail notifications on the loan(s) in question. ILL staff will clear the transaction(s) shortly thereafter, and once your account is free of any such excessively overdue items, you should receive a courtesy notice confirming that your ILLiad account has become unblocked, restoring you to full ILL privileges.

We appreciate your cooperation in getting all your ILLiad loans returned on time. This helps to keep our library in good standing with all the generous lenders with whom we do business, and in turn allows us to better serve our own customers.

Continue reading "Blocked ILLiad Accounts"

Posted on Carl's ILLiad Blog by Carl Mariani at 10:07 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Policies | Recommendations | Services

May 20, 2015

Don't Get Blocked! -- Maintaining Uninterrupted ILLiad Service at KSL

There are a few major reasons your ILLiad account and ILL privileges can become blocked. Two of these are as a result of delinquent status or incorrect data related to your library circulation account. The third is due to the status of your ILLiad account itself. These are listed below, along with the necessary actions required for resolving them. Please read on...

* Blocked Due to Library Fines

-- Your CWRU library circulation account is carrying an excess of $15.00 in fines, and this is blocking the authentication process that allows you to log into your ILLiad account. We recommend you pay down your fines to at least this amount -- or, better yet, completely down to $0.00 -- to resolve this issue. Contact staff at the KSL Main Service Desk at 216-368-3506 or smithcirc@case.edu if you have further questions or concerns.
** Additional explanations may be found in the ILLiad Customer Help page. You may also contact ILL staff at smithill@case.edu, for further assistance.

* Blocked Due to User Not Found

-- If you are setting up a new ILLiad account, you may have incorrectly entered your CASE Account Number in the registration form. You can verify this number at the following site: https://library.case.edu/loc/caseacct/. Access this information with your CASE Network ID and password, and copy it into the ILLiad new user page in the respective data field.
** Contact ILL staff at smithill@case.edu or Main Service Desk staff at smithcirc@case.edu, for assistance. Additional explanations may also be found in the ILLiad Customer Help page.
-- This happens less frequently, but your current CASE Account Number may not match the one originally entered into your ILLiad account. Again, please verify this number at the following site: https://library.case.edu/loc/caseacct/, and contact ILL staff at 216-368-3463 or 216-368-3517, or at smithill@case.edu for follow-up assistance.
** Additional explanations regarding this may be found in the ILLiad Customer Help page, as well.

* Blocked Due to Prolonged Overdue ILL Checkout

-- Finally, you may be able to log into your ILLiad account, but will be blocked from submitting any new ILL requests. This is due to your having at least one currently checked-out ILL loan in excess of 14 days overdue. Return any and all such check-outs to Kelvin Smith Library at your earliest opportunity, and contact ILL staff at 216-368-3463 or 216-368-3517, or at smithill@case.edu, to resolve this issue.
** Additional explanations may, of course, be found in the ILLiad Customer Help page.

We encourage all our library clientele to remain in good standing with both their main circulation and interlibrary loan accounts, so that we can continue to provide the best possible service in supporting their research needs. Thank you very much for your conscientiousness and cooperation.

Posted on Carl's ILLiad Blog by Carl Mariani at 10:10 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Policies | Recommendations | Services

May 19, 2015

CWRU PhD candidate in music awarded Fulbright Scholarship to study in Paris


News Release: May 19, 2015


Starting in September, Michael Bane, a fifth-year PhD candidate in music at Case Western Reserve University, will call Paris his home for a year.

Bane won a Fulbright Scholarship, giving him the opportunity to learn from many of the French music scholars at the Centre de musique baroque de Versailles and Centre d’études supérieures de la Renaissance in Tours who inspired his own work.

Bane’s scholarship represents the third Fulbright in three years for the music department, following last year’s winner, John Romey, who is still in Paris, and Alanna Ropchock, who did research on early music in Germany in 2013-14.

“This impressive streak—along with the many other awards and honors our students have received recently—reflects both the very high quality of the students we draw and the outstanding instruction and mentoring those students receive from their Department of Music faculty members. It’s a remarkable crew,” said department Chair David Ake.

Bane and Romey credit the guidance and direction from their advisor Georgia Cowart, professor of musicology, who, in researching the Parisian archives and libraries, made her own discoveries that linked politically driven art and music during the Baroque era.

Following the Fulbright Scholarship, Bane’s research received the Alm Award for Outstanding Student Paper a the Society for 17th –Century Music at the organization’s recent national meeting in Iowa City.

Bane, of Appleton, Wis., has been a playing guitar since age 11 and earned a Master of Music degree in classical guitar performance from Northwestern University in 2010. These days, the musician said he plays as much Chet Atkins as Bach.

The scholar plans to use his Fulbright to fill in missing pieces of French musical history—the contributions of its amateur performers.

“Then, as today, most musical performances were by amateur performers,” Bane said. He explained that amateur artists tend to be written out of musical history in favor of professional performers and composers.

He plans to account for that gap in French cultural history with research for his dissertation, “Honnêtes Gens as Musicians: The Amateur Experience in Seventeenth-Century Paris.”

Honnetês gens, he said, means “honest people” in French. The words describe a group of influential urban nobles and bourgeois that had the time and money to spend on self-refinement and musical performance, he said.

“They adhered to sophisticated rules of behavior and elevated etiquette to an art form,” he said. “My dissertation is going to be a far richer project now that I have the opportunity to examine so many rare and relevant sources in Paris.”
Aside from his research, Bane takes his pending role as a cultural ambassador seriously. He said he’s looking forward to working with French colleagues, speaking their language, experiencing a new way of life and contributing his perspective as an American.

Bane also expects the experience to be transformative for his work and provide valuable research opportunities through access to the city’s archives and libraries.

“A lot of my research deals with the music of 17th –century Paris,” he said. “So the chance to walk the same streets and speak the same language as the musicians I study is very exciting.”



Posted on Think by Susan Griffith at 07:42 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Official Release

May 19, 2015

$1.79 million NIH grant supports training for doctoral and postdoctoral researchers that could lead to better ways to manage multiple chronic illnesses


News Release: May 19, 2015



Case Western Reserve University’s Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing will begin training predoctoral and postdoctoral researchers to study people with multiple chronic illnesses in hopes of discovering better methods for managing such a complex combination of illnesses.

The school of nursing received a five-year, $1.79 million training grant from the National Institute of Nursing Research at the National Institutes of Health for the program, which starts July 1.

The program was based on the need to research and better understand the complex health-care situations presented by patients with multiple chronic conditions, such as diabetes, hypertension and heart disease, said Shirley M. Moore, RN, PhD, FAAN, the Edward J. and Louise Mellen Professor of Nursing, Associate Dean for Research and director of the Self Management for the Advancement through Research and Translation (SMART) Center.

Moore, who will direct the project, said the program’s goals are to:
• Reduce health disparities in vulnerable groups.
• Train and educate a culturally diverse workforce with research skills to identify what causes complex multiple chronic illnesses and how each illness might relate to the others.

Most at risk for multiple chronic illnesses are African-American and Hispanic people from low-income neighborhoods who lack access to appropriate health care and education, according to Moore.

The project, “Multiple Chronic Conditions: An Interdisciplinary Nursing Scientist Training Program,” will support eight doctoral students and nine postdoctoral researchers, providing each with stipends for two years. The grant also provides full tuition support for the PhD program and additional courses for postdocs during the two years in training.

Although trainees will not begin until July, Moore said the first group has been accepted.

Each researcher will work with mentors from various medical and social sciences fields. Trainees will also work with educators and mentors in the field of statistics to analyze and interpret complex data to find connections or patterns that might lead to new and better treatments for patients.

They will study why and how some chronic illnesses appear in clusters, which could help identify, for example, childhood health issues that lead to other diseases later in life, Moore said.

The grant also allows Case Western Reserve to partner with Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University’s School of Nursing, a historically black college, and Lehman College and Graduate School at City University of New York, which has a large Hispanic student population.

CWRU’s school of nursing will exchange education programs and seminars online and recruit top students from these institutions into a new complex health-care field.

Traditionally, treating illnesses—even when a person has more than one—involves examining each disease separately.

“We don’t really understand the complexity of, metabolically and biologically, what it means for your body, or psychologically or behaviorally what it means to integrate all those things,” Moore said. “This grant is about producing the next generation of nursing scientists to take into account better ways of caring for people with multiple chronic illnesses.”

To learn more about the program, contact Moore at shirley.moore@case.edu.


Posted on Think by Susan Griffith at 06:34 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Official Release

May 19, 2015

Experts to discuss economic impact of health care reform




News Release: Monday, May 18, 2015



How health care is obtained, provided and paid for in America is increasingly vital to the national economy. In the face of health care reform, urgent and practical responses on behalf of providers are essential.

Panelists from Northeast Ohio leading medical centers and DHG Healthcare will discuss how reforms will transform how they deliver care and measure quality outcomes.

The panel discussion “Healthcare Reform and Leading Provider Strategies” takes place from 6-8:30 p.m. on Wednesday, May 27, at Case Western Reserve University’s Tinkham Veale University Center. Panelists will address the mandatory reform elements influencing health care providers’ reimbursement.

The program was created by the Alumni Advisory Council of the Weatherhead School of Management, and it is sponsored by DHG Healthcare, the national healthcare practice of Dixon Hughes Goodman LLP. J.B. Silvers, the John R. Mannix Medical Mutual of Ohio Professor of Health Care Finance at the Weatherhead School, will serve as moderator.

"In the past, quality was in the eye of the provider and cost was whatever they decided to spend,” Silvers said. “Reform means turning this on its head. Now providers must meet cost and quality measures of value to succeed, and this requires serious innovation and the design of new approaches."

The panel will cover:
• Current mandatory reform elements and how they affect cost and employee effectiveness.
• Critical reform timeline and clinical performance periods.
• Lost payments to providers with poor clinical performance.
• Readmission penalties and at-risk payment opportunities.

Panelists include:

William Annable, MD, associate clinical professor of ophthalmology at Case Western Reserve School of Medicine and chief quality officer and director of University Hospitals Quality Institute

Alfred F. Connors Jr., MD, chief medical officer and chief quality officer at MetroHealth System

Melinda S. Hancock, FHFMA, CPA, partner at DHG Healthcare and national chair-elect of the Healthcare Financial Management Association

Shannon Phillips, MD, MPH, FAAP, associate chief quality officer at Cleveland Clinic

This event is free and open to the public. Registration is required by May 22. For more information and to register, visit this link:

https://weatherhead.case.edu/events/2015/05/27/healthcare-reform-and-leading-provider-strategies/


Posted on Think by Marvin Kropko at 04:37 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Official Release

March 24, 2015

Shape-shifting frog discovered in Ecuadorian Andes

Amphibian blends to surroundings, changing skin from smooth to spiny

March 24, 2015


CLEVELAND—A frog in Ecuador’s western Andean cloud forest changes skin texture in minutes, appearing to mimic the texture it sits on.

Originally discovered by a Case Western Reserve University PhD student and her husband, a projects manager at Cleveland Metroparks’ Natural Resources Division, the amphibian is believed to be the first known to have this shape-shifting capability.

But the new species, called Pristimantis mutabilis, or mutable rainfrog, has company. Colleagues working with the couple recently found that a known relative of the frog shares the same texture-changing quality—but it was never reported before.

The frogs are found at Reserva Las Gralarias, a nature reserve originally created to protect endangered birds in the Parish of Mindo, in north-central Ecuador.

The researchers, Katherine and Tim Krynak, and colleagues from Universidad Indoamérica and Tropical Herping (Ecuador) co-authored a manuscript describing the new animal and skin texture plasticity in the Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society this week. They believe their findings have broad implications for how species are and have been identified. The process may now require photographs and longer observations in the field to ensure that one species is not mistakenly perceived as two.

Katherine Krynak believes the ability to change skin texture to reflect its surroundings may enable P. mutabilis to help camouflage itself from birds and other predators.

The Krynaks originally spotted the small, spiny frog, nearly the width of a marble, sitting on a moss-covered leaf about a yard off the ground on a misty July night in 2009. The Krynaks had never seen this animal before, though Tim had surveyed animals on annual trips to Las Gralarias since 2001, and Katherine since 2005.

They captured the little frog and tucked it into a cup with a lid before resuming their nightly search for wildlife. They nicknamed it “punk rocker” because of the thorn-like spines covering its body.

The next day, Katherine Krynak pulled the frog from the cup and set it on a smooth white sheet of plastic for Tim to photograph. It wasn’t “punk ”—it was smooth-skinned. They assumed that, much to her dismay, she must have picked up the wrong frog.

“I then put the frog back in the cup and added some moss,” she said. “The spines came back… we simply couldn't believe our eyes, our frog changed skin texture!

“I put the frog back on the smooth white background. Its skin became smooth.”

“The spines and coloration help them blend into mossy habitats, making it hard for us to see them,” she said. “But whether the texture really helps them elude predators still needs to be tested.”

During the next three years, a team of fellow biologists studied the frogs. They found the animals shift skin texture in a little more than three minutes.

Juan M. Guayasamin, from Universidad Tecnológica Indoamérica, Ecuador, the manuscript’s first author, performed morphological and genetic analyses showing that P. mutabilis was a unique and undescribed species. Carl R. Hutter, from the University of Kansas, studied the frog’s calls, finding three songs the species uses, which differentiate them from relatives. The fifth author of the paper, Jamie Culebras, assisted with fieldwork and was able to locate a second population of the species. Culebras is a member of Tropical Herping, an organization committed to discovering, and studying reptiles and amphibians.

Guayasamin and Hutter discovered that Prismantis sobetes, a relative with similar markings but about twice the size of P. mutabilis, has the same trait when they placed a spiny specimen on a sheet and watched its skin turn smooth. P. sobetes is the only relative that has been tested so far.

Because the appearance of animals has long been one of the keys to identifying them as a certain species, the researchers believe their find challenges the system, particularly for species identified by one or just a few preserved specimens. With those, there was and is no way to know if the appearance is changeable.

The Krynaks, who helped form Las Gralarias Foundation (www.lasgralariasfoundation.org) to support the conservation efforts of the reserve, plan to return to continue surveying for mutable rain frogs. They'll work with fellow researchers to further document the frogs' behaviors, lifecycle and texture shifting, and estimate their population, all in effort to improve our knowledge and subsequent ability to conserve this paradigm-shifting species.

Further, they hope to discern whether more relatives have the ability to shift skin texture and if that trait comes from a common ancestor. If P. mutabilis and P. sobetes are the only species within this branch of Pristimantis frogs to have this capability, they hope to learn whether they retained it from an ancestor while relatives did not, or whether the trait evolved independently in each species.



Posted on Think by Kevin Mayhood at 07:25 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Official Release

May 12, 2015

siRNA-toting nanoparticles inhibit breast cancer metastasis


May 12, 2015


CLEVELAND—Researchers at Case Western Reserve University combined finely crafted nanoparticles with one of nature’s potent disrupters to prevent the spread of triple-negative breast cancer in mouse models.

The highly aggressive cancer subtype is difficult to manage and, currently, the FDA has no approved targeted treatments. But striking results from a new study, published in the journal Cancer Research make the researchers optimistic they have a potential game-changer for triple negative cancer and more.

“There are multiple targets within a cell,” said William Schiemann, professor of oncology at the Case Western Reserve School of Medicine and the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, and a leader of the research. “With this technology, we can target any gene or any location, for other cancers, more diseases—potentially even immunology-based diseases.”

Regular injections of nanoparticles carrying siRNA silenced the gene that regulates expression of the protein β3 integrin. Expression of β3 integrin in the cell-development process called the endothelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), is essential for the cancer to spread from its primary tumor.

Nearly 15 percent of breast cancers in the United States are triple negative, and the subtype is most prevalent among African-American women in their 20s and 30s

According to the National Cancer Institute, the five-year survival rate for women whose cancer is discovered early and contained to a primary tumor is 98 percent. But, the survival rate for those diagnosed with distant metastases plummets to less than 25 percent.

To try to tackle metastasis, Schiemann teamed with Zheng-Rong Lu, the M. Frank and Margaret Domiter Rudy Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Case Western Reserve, Jenny Parvani, now a postdoctoral investigator, PhD student Maneesh Gujrati and undergraduate student Margaret Mack.

Lu’s lab has been developing lipid-based nanoparticles to deliver medicines to specific targets in the body for a decade. Lipids include fats and oils, but these organic molecules are also building blocks in cell structures and functions.

Schieman’s lab investigates ways to manipulate the EMT process. He suggested they target the β3 integrin gene with siRNA, short for small interfering RNA or silencing RNA.

The nanoparticle, which Lu labeled ECO, navigates a number of roadblocks. It crosses the blood-brain barrier, which is key to effective therapy. Metastatic cells from this type of cancer often lodge in the brain.

ECO withstands degradation and remains cloaked from the body’s immune system while circulating in the blood. ECO induces endosomes to wrap and transport it inside a cancer cell. The particle’s makeup prevents entrapment in the endosomal membrane and digestion by enzyme-packed lysosomes.

The nanoparticles are coated with RGD peptide that draws them to the gene that controls expression of β3 integrin. When attached to the gene, TGF-β, the nanoparticle releases siRNA, which jams the machinery.

The study adds to growing evidence that a lack of β3 integrin stops production of migrating cancer cells.

In this study, five mice with a mouse version of triple-negative breast cancer were injected with particles every five days for 14 weeks. Compared to control mice, the treated mice’s tumors shrunk significantly, but more importantly, the treatment significantly inhibited metastasis.

Five mice with human triple-negative breast cancer received the same treatment, which produced the same results.

“The results were really, really surprising,” Lu said.

“I was shocked, actually,” Schiemann said. “We can do most anything invitro in the lab, but to do this in the live body of a mouse is a huge hurdle to clear.”

Four weeks after treatment was stopped, the treated mice remained tumor free while cancer continued to grow in untreated controls.

No significant difference in body weight across treatment groups and controls were found, indicating low toxicity of the treatments.

The researchers are further testing whether the delivery system is safe and seeking grants for dosing experiments and other steps toward clinical trials.

“We’re also looking at different genes, different therapies and more delivery platforms,” Lu said.

The work is funded by National Institutes of Health grants EB00489, CA129359, CA177069, National Science Foundation grant DGE-0951783, and Department of Defense grant BC133808.



Posted on Think by Kevin Mayhood at 03:28 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Official Release

May 12, 2015

Professor Diana Bilimoria begins new Coursera MOOC called Women in Leadership: Inspiring Positive Change




Tuesday, May 12, 2015



Case Western Reserve University Professor of Organizational Behavior Diana Bilimoria is attracting a global audience to her expertise on how women and men can achieve their full leadership potential in their workplaces.

Her massive open online course (MOOC), called Women in Leadership: Inspiring Positive Change, begins Friday, May 15. Offered free through the Coursera platform, the course allows enrolled students to participate online from anywhere. It’s a way to experience and learn from concepts Bilimoria has developed through her well-known and highly regarded management research.

Bilimoria is KeyBank Professor and Chair of Organizational Behavior at the Weatherhead School of Management. Her Coursera offering is the third from the faculty at the management school and eighth overall from Case Western Reserve.

“The course looks at the internal and external forces that shape our identities as leaders and how women and men can learn to understand and use these forces to become inspiring agents of change, whether at work or in the world at large,” she said in a video within Coursera’s course description. To enroll, visit https://www.coursera.org/course/womeninleadership.

The course goals are to:
 Enhance understanding of yourself and your leadership identity.
 Gain a deep understanding of the dynamics and experiences of women in organizations.
 Identify and enhance effective leadership practices for yourself and for women in your organization.
 Define your vision of career success and work-life integration, identify necessary skills, resources and networks for career development and create a plan of action to accomplish your goals.

Bilimoria is thrilled about the global reach of this MOOC. “It’s about taking the brand and story of our university to the world,” she said.

Enrollment is already in the thousands, with participants from more than 140 nations. Bilimoria has been contacted by companies wanting to make sure their employees are aware of the opportunity.

There will be weekly videos and readings related to the topics covered. Course participants will be required to reflect on the concepts learned by completing a personal learning journal and undertaking exercises to connect to the experiences of others. They will receive practical guidance and tools to effectively lead through organizational and cultural roadblocks, and developing a leadership vision founded on their core values.

Students will write a culminating paper, including concepts and action assignments completed in the course. This final project will be a peer-reviewed assignment.

“The peer-review process not only allows students to receive feedback from others in the course, but further enforces the concepts by exposing the students to varying viewpoints and insights,” she said.

Bilimoria is a co-author of Women in STEM Careers: International Perspectives on Increasing Workforce Participation, Advancement and Leadership (Edward Elgar, 2014) and Gender Equity in Science and Engineering: Advancing Change in Higher Education (Routledge, 2012).

Her research focuses on gender and diversity in governance and leadership, and organizational transformation. Her studies have helped corporate, educational and nonprofit organizations establish practices that attract and retain a high-performance, diverse workforce.

Her teaching and executive education activities focus on executive leadership and gender, diversity and inclusion in organizations. She received the Weatherhead School of Management Teaching Excellence Award in 2014.


Posted on Think by Marvin Kropko at 03:10 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Official Release

May 04, 2015

Review KSL's revised summer hours

Take a moment to review revised summer hours for Kelvin Smith Library, the Freedman Center and Cramelot Cafe. Please note that there are no 24/7 hours during the summer schedule.

KSL Summer Business Hours*:

  • Sunday: closed
  • Monday - Thursday: 8 a.m. - 8 p.m.
  • Friday: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
  • Saturday: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

*Service desk transactions with library staff end 30 minutes prior to the closing hour.


Freedman Center for Digital Scholarship

  • Sunday: closed
  • Monday - Thursday: 9 a.m. - 6 p.m.
  • Friday: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
  • Saturday: 12 p.m. - 5 p.m.


Cramelot Cafe
Cramelot will be closed May 9 - May 31, and will reopen June 1 - July 24 with the following hours:

  • Sunday: closed
  • Monday - Friday: 8:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.
  • Saturday: closed


For more information, please call 216-368-6500.


Posted on KSL News Blog by Hannah Levy at 04:06 PM | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: KSL Services & Spaces

May 07, 2015

CWRU researchers look at sibling relationships and maternal warmth to help abused children


News Release: May 7, 2015


Researchers at Case Western Reserve University have begun studying 1,700 children from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW) database to understand how mothers and siblings can protect abused children who have witnessed family violence.

“I want to focus on their positive characteristics in protecting children and eventually create an intervention that builds on those strengths,” said Megan R. Holmes, assistant professor of social work at Case Western Reserve’s Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences.
Holmes is leading the two-year project, “The Longitudinal Effects of Family Violence: Sibling factors and Maternal Parenting.” The study builds on Holmes’ investigations into intimate partner violence (IPV) between adults in the home and how it affects children, both physically and psychologically.

All the children selected from the NSCAW database have been investigated by Child Protective Services for some form of maltreatment.

The survey’s information provides researchers with first-hand accounts by parents, teachers and caseworkers about the children’s circumstances. Each child has had data collected about his or her family life at four different times from birth to 11 years old.

Holmes received $158,500 from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development at the National Institutes of Health (grant # 1R03HD078416-01A1) to support the project. She will be assisted by Adam Perzynski, assistant professor , Center for Health Care Research and Policy at Case Western Reserve School of Medicine at MetroHeatlh Medical Center, and Sonia Minnes, associate professor of social work at the Mandel School.

The project will examine the relationship between child abuse (neglect, physical and/or psychological mistreatment), sibling dynamics (birth order, gender and number of children in the family), maternal warmth (nurturing, support, love, concern, comfort and trust) and the social and emotional adjustment of the abused children over time.

“Better sibling relationships have better outcomes,” Holmes said.

Holmes has witnessed how older children have protected and shielded younger family members from seeing and hearing violence in the homes. As a result, however, the older children tend to have more mental health problems, she said.

Through her research, Holmes hopes to change that outcome and learn how:

• Internal and external behavior patterns and social skills develop in IPV-exposed children;
• Child abuse effects this behavioral and social development in IPV-exposed children;
• Sibling factors can work to protect the abused child exposed to IPV in the home;
• And what particularly in maternal warmth buffers children against witnessing and experiencing family violence.

Holmes also has a study underway examining the quality of sibling relationships, which she expects to contribute to designing an intervention that focuses on positive factors in those relationships.



Posted on Think by Susan Griffith at 12:13 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Official Release

May 07, 2015

CWRU researchers look at sibling relationships and maternal warmth to help abused children


News Release: May 7, 2015


Researchers at Case Western Reserve University have begun studying 1,700 children from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW) database to understand how mothers and siblings can protect abused children who have witnessed family violence.

“I want to focus on their positive characteristics in protecting children and http://msass.case.edu/?s=Megan+R.+Holmeseventually create an intervention that builds on those strengths,” said Megan R. Holmes, assistant professor of social work at Case Western Reserve’s Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences.
Holmes is leading the two-year project, “The Longitudinal Effects of Family Violence: Sibling factors and Maternal Parenting.” The study builds on Holmes’ investigations into intimate partner violence (IPV) between adults in the home and how it affects children, both physically and psychologically.

All the children selected from the NSCAW database have been investigated by Child Protective Services for some form of maltreatment.

The survey’s information provides researchers with first-hand accounts by parents, teachers and caseworkers about the children’s circumstances. Each child has had data collected about his or her family life at four different times from birth to 11 years old.

Holmes received $158,500 from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development at the National Institutes of Health (grant # 1R03HD078416-01A1) to support the project. She will be assisted by Adam Perzynski, assistant professor , Center for Health Care Research and Policy at Case Western Reserve School of Medicine at MetroHeatlh Medical Center, and Sonia Minnes, associate professor of social work at the Mandel School.

The project will examine the relationship between child abuse (neglect, physical and/or psychological mistreatment), sibling dynamics (birth order, gender and number of children in the family), maternal warmth (nurturing, support, love, concern, comfort and trust) and the social and emotional adjustment of the abused children over time.

“Better sibling relationships have better outcomes,” Holmes said.

Holmes has witnessed how older children have protected and shielded younger family members from seeing and hearing violence in the homes. As a result, however, the older children tend to have more mental health problems, she said.

Through her research, Holmes hopes to change that outcome and learn how:

• Internal and external behavior patterns and social skills develop in IPV-exposed children;
• Child abuse effects this behavioral and social development in IPV-exposed children;
• Sibling factors can work to protect the abused child exposed to IPV in the home;
• And what particularly in maternal warmth buffers children against witnessing and experiencing family violence.

Holmes also has a study underway examining the quality of sibling relationships, which she expects to contribute to designing an intervention that focuses on positive factors in those relationships.



Posted on Think by Susan Griffith at 12:13 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Official Release

May 05, 2015

No More A Jew

Pam Geller is no longer a Jew.


Word is that destruction of the Muslims won't protect the Jews. In fact, we are next in line!!

So Please leave your Mezuzzah, drop the shofar, put away the kiddush cup, since you are now free.

Freedom's just another word for nothing left to lose.

Posted on iDEA FACTORY ii by Alan Lerner at 06:28 PM | Comments (2) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: ADFI | Geller | Pam

May 05, 2015

Treating gum disease reduces prostate symptoms, CWRU researchers find


News Release: May 5, 2015



Treating gum disease reduced symptoms of prostate inflammation, called prostatitis, report researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine and the Departments of Urology and Pathology at University Hospitals Case Medical Center.

Previous studies have found a link between gum disease and prostatitis, a disease that inflames the gland that produces semen. Inflammation can make urination difficult.

“This study shows that if we treat the gum disease, it can improve the symptoms of prostatitis and the quality of life for those who have the disease,” said Nabil Bissada, chair of Case Western Reserve’s Department of Periodontics and the new study’s corresponding author.

The researchers reported their findings in the Dentistry article, “Periodontal Treatment Improves Prostate Symptoms and Lowers Serum PSA in Men with High PSA and Chronic Periodontitis.” Naif Alwithanani, a graduate student in the dental school, led the investigation as part of his residency in periodontics.

Bissada explained that gum disease not only affects the mouth, but is a system-wide condition that can cause inflammation in various parts of the body. The dental school has previously found a link between gum disease and fetal deaths, rheumatoid arthritis and heart disease.

The new prostate study

Researchers studied 27 men, 21 years old and older. Each had had a needle biopsy within the past year that confirmed inflammation of the prostate gland, and a blood test that showed elevated prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels—possible signs of inflammation and cancer.

The men were assessed for symptoms of prostate disease by answering questions on the International-Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) test about their quality of life and possible urination issues.

Researchers found 21 of the 27 participants had no or mild inflammation, but 15 had biopsy-confirmed malignancies. Two had both inflammation and a malignancy.

The men also had to have at least 18 teeth and were examined for signs of gum disease, such as increased levels of inflammation and bleeding and/or loose teeth due to attachment and bone loss.

All the men had moderate to severe gum disease, for which they received treatment. They were tested again for periodontal disease four to eight weeks later and showed significant improvement.

During the periodontal care, the men received no treatment for their prostate conditions. But even without prostate treatment, 21 of the 27 men showed decreased levels of PSA. Those with the highest levels of inflammation benefited the most from the periodontal treatment. Six participants showed no changes.
Symptom scores on the IPSS test also showed improvement.

Bissada is now conducting follow-up research to support the first study’s findings. He hopes to make periodontal treatment a standard part of treating prostate disease, much like cardiac patients are often encouraged to visit their dentist before undergoing heart procedures and a dental checkup is advised for women who are pregnant or considering pregnancy.

Case Western Reserve dental researchers Nishant Joshi, Catherine Demko and Robert Skillicorn; and University Hospitals Case Medical Center researchers Donald Bodner, Lee Ponsky, Sanjay Gupta and Gregory T. MacLennan contributed to the study.


Posted on Think by Susan Griffith at 01:01 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Official Release

May 04, 2015

Education level and dental habits of low-income parents linked to their children’s oral health; Researchers hope to improve dental health by changing caregiver behavior



News Release: May 4, 2015




Studies have long associated low-income areas with poor oral health. But dental researchers at Case Western Reserve University and University of Washington sensed that other factors related to income may be at work—in particular, education level.

So they recently investigated how a parent or other caregiver’s education level and dental habits affect children's dental health.

With data from 423 low-income African-American kindergarteners and their caregivers from a CWRU dental school study in 2007, researchers tested the hypothesis that a caregiver’s education level influences how often they and their children brush their teeth and visit the dentist for routine checkups, and how those habits result in decayed or filled teeth.

The results supported the hypothesis:

• Caregivers who completed high school were 1.76 times more likely to visit the dentist, compared with those who did not graduate high school.

• The children of caregivers with high school diplomas were nearly six times more likely to visit the dentist routinely.

• Children who visited the dentist regularly had about one-fourth as many untreated cavities as those who didn’t.

• The education level of caregivers was directly associated with about a third fewer untreated decayed teeth, and 28 percent fewer decayed or filled teeth among the children they cared for.

The findings, reported in the Caries Research article, “Caregiver’s Education Level and Children Dental Caries in African Americans: A Path Analytic Study,” confirm the role of caregiver education in child dental decay and indicate that the caregiver's behavior influences a child’s oral health habits.

As a result, researchers hope to encourage parents to become better role models for their children, who pick up on both the positive and negative habits of their caregivers.
In the past, improving oral health has focused on educating children about good dental habits. The research team has provided children in the study with dental examinations, tooth sealants, toothbrushes and toothpaste. Children also received lessons on proper care of their teeth.

When dental problems where found during annual exams, letters were sent to parents to tell them their children needed follow-up dental care. But not all caregivers sought help for their children, Heima said.

And nearly 100 of the study’s participants—with or without a high school education— did not seek routine dental care at least once a year.

So it was the clear the message wasn’t getting through.

“Changing their ways with literature and instructions, didn’t always work,” said Masahiro Heima, a pediatric dentist and faculty member at Case Western Reserve School of Dental Medicine. “So we need to focus on behavioral changes.”

Lee Wonik and Suchitra Nelson, from Case Western Reserve School of Dental Medicine, and Peter Milgrom, from University of Washington School of Dentistry, contributed to the study.
Health Resources and Service Administration’s Maternal and Child Health Bureau (R40-MC07838) and the National Center for Research Resources’ Clinical Translational Study (UL1 RR024989) funded the study.


Posted on Think by Susan Griffith at 01:19 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Entry is tagged: Official Release